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"AULD LANE 5YI\IE 





IHE 


BOMB 


VOLUME XXV 


1 


^ 


CLASS OF 1909 


VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE 


LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 





Contents 



PAGE 

Board of Editors 8 

Calendar 11 

Dedication 4 

Editorial 7 

Faculty 15 

Sub-Faculty 17 

Post Staff 19 

Board of Visitors 13 

foukdation and development of v. ji. 1 21 

Senior Class 41 

Statistics 42-63 

Ex-Classmates 64 

History 67 

Banquet 71 

Class of 1910 73 

History 75 

Class of 1911 81 

History- 84 

Class of 1912 87 

History 91 

George Cook Ferrebee, Memorial 94 

Military Department 95 

Tactical Officers 97 

Commissioned Officers 99 

Battalion Organization 100 

Company A 101 

Company B 102 

Company C 103 

Company D 104 

Report of Government Inspector 105 

Busted 108 

The Summer School 128 

Athletics 131 



CONTENTS- Continued 



PAGE 

Graduate ilanagar 13J 

Board 133 

Football 137 

Line Up 141 

iiaseball 147 

Team 151 

Basket-ball 155 

Team 157 

Gymnasium 161 

Team 165 

Wearers of the Monograms 166 

Songs and Yells 1 67 

Chemistry Department 173 

Electrical Department 171 

Engineering Department 169 

"The Cadet" Staff 177 

Y. M. C. A 181 

Improvements 115 

Reminiscences of a Rat 117 

The Washington Trip ' 109 

Cotillion Club 187 

Dialectic Literary Society 180 

Dramatic Club 179 

Mandolin Club 183 

Penalty Tourists 185 

The Press Club 184 

Vestry of the Episcopal Church Club 199 

Final Week 189 

Final German 191 

V. iL I. Biography 197 

V. M. I. Alumni Associations 200 

Acknowledgments 201 

Advertisements 203 



DeDicateD to 

Colonel j^. 38e\3erb^ Cucfeer 

&p tjje Class of 1909 

as a mark of tlje respect anD esteem of tlje corps of caDets, 

anD in recognition of f)is faitfjful lafior for tije 

aDtiancement of atftletics at I?, m, 3. 



OBDitorial 



THIS Bomb marks the twenty-fifth consecutive volume, published 
by the cadets. Dealing with the same subjects, year after year, 
there is of necessity a certain amount of plagiarism, at least, in 
ideas. We have succeeded in making some changes from Kombs of the 
past, which we trust our readers will consider impi'ovements. If we 
have published an annual that will show the dear old place to the 
public in its true worth, and that will recall fond memories to the ever- 
swelling body of alumni, we will feel that our labor has not been in vain. 

Editors. 



Ci)e ISomb ^tnft 



J. G. RICHARDSON Editor-in-Chief 

T. M. SCOTT Business Manages 

0. GATES Assistant Business Manager 

B. D. MAYO Advertising Editor 

C. W. JENKINS Assistant Advertising Editor 

R. M. GRAjVIMER Athletic Editor 

L. N. BRITTON Art Editor 

J. MAGRUDER \ 

G. W. POLK ' Associate Editors 

S. L. HAYES j 




The Bomb Staff 



CalenDat 



Seiitember 2 — Xew Cadets reported. 

September t) — Old Cadets reported for duty. Scliool opened. 

September 11 and 12 — Opening Hops. 

October 3 — Football Season ojjened with William and iiary College at Le.xington. 

October 10 — Hampden-Sidney College game at Lexington. 

October 17 — St. John's College at Lexington. 

October 24 — ^V. P. I. game at Roanoke. 

October 31 — Fateful game with RoanoUe College. 

November 11 — Founder's Day. Holiday. 

December 4 and 5 — Thanksgi\ing Hops. 

December 25 — Christmas Holidays — Reveille and Parade as usual. 

December 31 to January 1 — First Class .Annual lianquet at Castle Hill. 

January 1 and 2 — New Year Hops. 

January 19 — Lee's Birthday — Holiday. 

February 22 — Washington's Birthday — Holiday; Subs' Hop. 

March 3-5 — In Washington for the Inaugural Parade. 

March 27 — Baseliall season opened with Fisjiburne School in Lexington. 

April 3 — ^Hampden-Sidney College in Lexington. 

April 8 — St. John's College in Lexington. 

April 10 — Roanoke College in Lexington. 

April 12 — Y. P. I. game in Roanoke. 

April 10 — ^Easter German. 

April 17 — Richmond College in Lexington. Easter Hop. 

April 24 — Open. 

April 30 — Davidson College in Lexington. 

May 8 — Open. 

May 12 — -Milligan College in Lexington. 

May 15 — New Market Day. Holiday. 

June 1 — Memorial Day. 

June 18 — Finals begin. Opening Hop. 

June 19 — Gymnasium Exhibit. 

June 20 — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 21 — Final German. 

June 22 — Society Hop. Alumni Smoker. 

June 23 — The end of things Military — Auld Lang Syne — Dismissed. 

June 23— Final Ball. 




Board of Visitors 



'BoarD of l^isitors 



(Terms expire July 1, 111 10.) 

DR. EAWLEY W. MARTIN Lynchburg, Va. 

COL. T. J. NOTTINGHAJI Norfolk, Va. 

COL. FRANCIS L. SMITH. . ; Alexandria, Va. 

HON. T. L. TATE Draper. ^'A. 

(Terms expire July 1, 1912.) 

GEORGE L. BRO^YNING. ESQ Orange, Va. 

HON. R. A. JAMES Danville, Va. 

HON. EDWARD ECHOLS Staunton, Va. 

DR. J. F. BRANSFORD Bon Air, Va. 

MR. CHARLES E. TACKETT Fredericksburg, Va. 

MEMBERS OF BOAEB, EX OFFICIO 

GEN. CHARLES J. ANDERSON. Adjutant General Richmond, Va. 

HON. JOS. D. EGGLESTON, JR., Superintendent PlBLIC Instruction Richmond, Va. 



jracultp anD post ^taff 



GENERAL, SCOTT SHIPP, LL. D. 

SUPERINTENDENT EMERITUS 

GENERAL EDWARD W. NICHOLS 

SUPERINTENDENT f 

COLONEL HUNTER PENDLETON, A. M,, Pii. U. 

PROFESSOR OF GENERAL AND APPLIED UHEIIISTRY 

COLONEL N. BEVERLEY TUCKER, C. E., B. S. 

PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY AND SIINERALOGY AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY 

COLONEL FRANCIS MALLORY, C. E. 

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

COLONEL HENRY C. FORD, B. S., Ph. D. 

PKOFESSOR OF LATIN, ENGLISH. AND HISTORY 

COLONEL J. MERCER PATTON, A. M. 

PROFESSOR OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

COLONEL MORRELL M. MILLS 
Cfiptain U. S. Coast Artillery Corps 

PROFESSOR OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND COMMANDANT OF CADETS 

COLONEL THOMAS A. JONES, B. S. 

PROFESSOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

COLONEL CHARLES W. WATTS, C. E. 

PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS AND MECHANICS 

■"'MAJOR R. BARCLAY POAGUIfi, B. S. 

PROFESSOR OF DRAWING, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

*CAPTA1N ST. J. R. MARSHALL 

ADJUTANT 

tMAJOR J. H. LAIRD 

SURGEON 

COLONEL W. T. POAGUE 

TREASURER AND MILITARY STOREKEEPER 

CAPTAIN J. W. GILMORE 

COMMISSARY AND QUARTERMASTER 

CAPTAIN J. W. GILLOCK 

ASSISTANT MILITARY STOREKEEPER 



"Not in cut on opposite page. 

tResigned January 1, 1909. Succeeded by Dr. Reid White. 




Sub Faculty 



ju6-JFacuItp 



CAPTAIN ST. J. R. JJARSHALL 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ELECTRICAL AKD STEAM ENGIKEERIKG, AND PHYSICS 

CAPTAIN MAX Q. KELLEY, B. S. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LATIN AND ENGLISH 

CAPTAIN R. B. BURROUGHS 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS 

CAPTAIN H. E. MECREDY 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF JIATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING 

CAPTAIN C. H. OWEN- 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ENGINEERING AND DRAWING 

CAPTAIN W. T. DA V ANT 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND HISTORY 

CAPTAIN M. F. EDWARDS 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS AND MODERN LANGUAGES 

CAPTAIN C. H. CARTER 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

CAPTAIN J. Q. PIERCE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND HISTORY 

CAPTAIN J. E. DOYLE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS AND GYMNASIUM INSTRUCTOR 




KPT.J.VJ-Oii-MORC 



I'OST STAFI' 



^ilitarp ^taff 



COLONEL ^A•. T. P0AC4UE 

TKEASURER AND MILITARY STOREKEEPER 

*MAJOR J. H. LAIRD, M. D. 

SURGEON 

CAPTAIN ST, J. E. JIARSHALL 

POST ADJUTANT 

CAPTAIN J. W. C4ILiI0EE 

COMMISSARY AND QUARTERMASTER 

CAPTAIN J. ^A', GILLOCK 

ASSISTANT JlIILITARY STOREKEEPER 



"Kesimied Jaiuiaiv 1. IIIOII. Sueeeedeil by Dr. Reid \\'hite. il. D. 



A History of the Foundation and Development of the 
Virginia Mihtary Institute 



THE eleventh day of November, 1839, was a day big with rfate for the 
educational and material interest of the good old Commonwealth of Vir- 
ginia, at least, so think the cadets and alnmni of the Virginia Military In- 
stitute, which was founded on that day. The Institute was a military school 
from the start, in a sense in which no other school in the country was a military 
school, not even West Point. Like the Institute, "West Point started from a very 
small beginning, but the cadets of that institution never did duty as garrison of a 
military post; this duty was performed by soldiers of the army. At the 
Institute the cadets relieved the enlisted men in the service of the state, who 
were the guards of the Western Arsenal of Virginia, and thereafter performed 
all the military duties of the soldiers, at the same time pursuing the prescribed 
course of scientific and military studies. 

The first Board of Visitors met in May, 1839. The president of the board 
was Col. Claude Crozet, a higlily educated and accomplished French soldier 
who had served in the disastrous Russian campaign of 1812, under the great 
ISTapoleon. Coming to this country, he was professor of mathematics, and civil 
and military engineering, at the United States Military Academy at West 
Point. Having resigned this position, he took service under the State of 
Virginia as chief engineer. There were other distinguished soldiers on this 
first board, three of whom had served as officers in the War of 1812 ; one of 
these three, Captain Wiley, had marched with his company from Petersburg, 
Virginia, to Quebec, Canada. Then there were jDrominent and able men who 
had not been soldiers, most prominent amongst whom were Governor James 
McDowell and John T. L. Preston, Esq., of Lexington, Virginia. The latter, 
a highly educated and ciiltured gentleman, may, in a marked sense, be re- 
garded as the founder of the Institute. It was he who most earnestly and ably 
argued with voice and pen during those three years in which was pending the 
question of supplanting the garrison of soldiers with a garrison of young Vir- 
ginians, who should do the duty of the soldiers and at the same time qualify 
themselves by study to do their part as teachers and workers in the great in- 
dustrial development about to da\vn upon the old State. 

The primary idea was to get rid of the rather vagabondish old soldiers, 
and to educate, in their places, twenty young men, to be boarded and educated 



free of charge, in consideration of their niilitarv service. The jDrogram of 
study, and the mode of training and life submitted to the public by the board 
and superintendent, proved so attractive that many sought the jDrivileges of the 
infant iustitution, upon the condition that they should pay their own way 
and voluntarily assume, under formal written obligations in the nature of 
articles of enlistment, to render subordination and do the military duties im- 
]30sed by law upon state cadets. The restricted accommodations of the old soldier 
barracks limited the number which could be admitted ; but twelve of these 
\'olunteers were accepted, who, with the twenty to be maintained by the State, 
made a corps consisting of one company of thirty-two young soldiers. The 
conditions of life surrounding these yovmg pioneers were harsh and uninviting. 
Quartet's were cramped, and rooms were crowded, even for the small number 
of thirty-two, and the fare, while abundant, was rough. There were no proper 
classrooms, no library, no apparatus of any kind ; and the old flint-lock muskets, 
caliber .69, were clumsy, heavy, and hard to keep clean. The band consisted 
of two old negroes, Eeuben and Alike ; one lieat the kettledrum, the other 
whistled through the fife. 

The board made a wise choice in the selection of a su]:)erintendent. Prof. 
Francis IT. Smith, professor of mathematics in the honored old College of 
Hampden-Sidney, Va. Professor Smith was born in Norfolk, Ya. ; after re- 
ceiving the usual education taught in the best classical schools of the times, 
he was appointed a cadet in the U. S. Military Academy in 1S29, and was 
graduated in 18.3.3. Fpon graduation he was tendered an appointment as an 
assistant ])rofessor of mathematics and also of artillery in the Academy, both 
of which he declined, and joined his regiment, the first V. S. Artillery at Fort 
Turnbull, Conn. After serving with his regiment at various stations, he was 
ordered to West Point as assistant ])rofessor of moral and political philosophy 
and rhetoric in October, 1834. This duty he discharged until 1835, when he 
resigned with the intention of entering civil life. This intention was some- 
what deferred and he did duty with the V. S. Corps of Topographical Engin- 
eers, exploring an inland route through the souikIs of North Carolina, between 
Norfolk and Charleston. While engaged in this duty, he was elected profes- 
sor of mathematics in ITami)den-Sidney College, which position he acce]itcd 
September, 1837; while discharging the duties of his chair, he was called to 
take charge of the Virginia Military Institute as superintendent and professor 
of mathematics, in 1839. Although the class to be taught in mathematics was 
small when Professor Smith entered iqion his duties at the IMilitary Institute., 




(!i;nkiial Kiia 



•IS II. Smith 



he was, as superiiiteiideiit, diavged with the nrjiaiiizatioii and odvcviiincnt of 
the iufaiit schdnl, and in additinn acted as conmuunhint (if cadets and iiistnictnr 
of Tactics. 

If the linai'd was furtiinate in secnvinc,' the services of Professdi' Snnth, Pro- 
fessor Smith was still nmre fortnnate in the selection by the linard of his sole 
coadjutor, John T. L. Preston, one of their own inenibers, a citizen of Lt^xiiii^ton, 
a more zealous, faithful, conscientious, loyal coadjntor no man in this world 
evev had. Professor Preston took charge of the class in lanonage. He was 
i>orn in Lexington, Va., and, having been trained in the best classical schools 
of the State, was graduated from Washington College and received the degree 
(if A. ^I. He then entered the I'niversitv of Virsiinia, reccivinii' the usual 



certificates of distinction in tlie several schools taken by him. On leaving 
the University, he entered Yale College to comjjlete the couree of studies 
marked ont for himself in the profession of law, which he had chosen. He 
did not, however, remain long at the bar, his inclinations leading him in an- 
other direction. When the discussion commenced in 1836, in connection with 
the organization of the Military Institute, his mind was actively at work on 
this important scheme; so that, when the Institute entered upon its mission in 
1839, he was willing to lend the influence of his talents in one of the most 
important department of instruction, as more in harmony with his own tastes, 
and as an earnest of his interest in the success of the school. The French and 
German languages occupied the attention of Professor Preston for the first 
two years. Subsequently, at diiferent times, he was relieved from instruction 
of the languages, above mentioned, and taught Latin logic, rhetoric, intellectual 
philosophy, and constitutional law, never, of course, having all these subjects 
at any one time. 

These two, Colonel Smith and ]\Iajor Preston, constituted the whole corps 
of permanent instructors for the first two years. A three-years' course had 
been marked out for cadets, and the thirty-two cadets who first entered were 
all assigned to the third, or lowest class. The next year, when most of these 
cadets were advanced to the second class, and a small new class had entered 
to take the places of those who had been for any cause discharged, an arrange- 
ment was made with the trustees of Washington College by which Professor 
Armstrong of that college gave cadets instruction given to those students of the 
College who might desire such instruction. 

The conditions of education existing in Virginia, indeed throughout the 
country, and in England, at the time the Institute was organized were pecTiliar. 
It is difficult to realize and conceive the state of existence of the most highly 
civilized people in the world, a short four himdred years ago, when few could 
read or write, even among those of highest social position, and the cost of such 
hand-transcribed books as existed was almost prohibitive. Of course, there 
have always been books of some sort, and masters and scholars. Thales and 
Pythagoras, Zeno and Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, wrote and taught in ancient 
Greece, hundreds of years before the Christian Era. Even today in ancient 
Cairo of Egypt in the mosque of Al Azahr, you will find a library of seven 
thousand volumes, all on the Koran, and many hundreds of grown men from 
all parts of the Mohammedan world, men from Cyprus and Crete, from Egypt 
and Turkey, Zanzibar and Xubia, Bokhara and Samarcand, and other remote 



parts, sitting on the floor, rocking their bodies and studying half aloud the 
Koran. This Mohammedan education of today is somewhat typical of the 
monastic education of mediaeval times. Thus the monks and ]n'iests alone 
studied and taught, and preserved such learning as existed, for the most part 
profitless. In England down to times less than one hundred years ago, little 
progress had been made in improvement of media3val educational aims and 
methods. Greek and Latin, with some metaphysics, were almost the sole topics 
taught, notwitlistanding that the Baconian inductive process for investigating 
and establishing truth had long been known. The educational system of Eng- 
land, as it continued into the 19th century was designed to fit men for the 
church, the bar, for literature, and to refine and polish, as they thought, the 
idle and unprofitable upper stratum of their social body. The educational 
system prevailing in this country until well on into the nineteenth cejitury was 
modeled upon that of England. The true aim and end of education is to 
develop, train, and bring ijito conscious existence those faculties with which 
the good God has endowed to a greater or less degree all men in execution of 
His benevolent will and purpose toward us. Education should be designed 
not for a class, but for all according to their several capabilities. This his- 
torian Motley, speaking of education as it existed until times comparatively 
recent, says : "The whole system was, however, pervaded by the monastic spirit, 
which had originally preserved all learning from annihilation, but which now 
kept it wrapt in the ancient cerecloths, and stitt'ening in the strong sarcophagus 
of a bygone age." As late as i850 the U. S. Commission of education wrote : 
"Although there are millions who know that there is something wrong in the 
system of education, yet it is extremely difficult to discover the cause, as we 
are in a measure brought up in the same error, and as that requires unusual 
effort to remove the vail of error which shrouds the truth." The i3resident of 
Brown University wrote, about the same time : "We have constructed the colleges 
upon the idea that they are to be schools of preparation for the professions. 
Our customers, therefore, come from the smallest class of society and the 
education which we prescribe is not so universally recognized as formerly, even 
by this class. We have produced an article for which the demand is diminish- 
ing. We sell it at less than cost and the deficiency is made up by charity. 
We give it away and still the demand diminishes. There has existed for the 
last twenty years a demand for civil engineers. Has the demand been supplied 
by our colleges ? We presume the single academy at West Point, graduating 
annually a smaller number than many of our colleges, has done more for the 





The JACKSON Statue 



eonstriTction of our railroads than all of our one hnndred and twenty colleges 
united." 

Such were the conditions of education existing in this state, and through- 
out the country, when the Virginia Military Institute entered upon its eventful 
mission, a mission fraught with benefit to the whole land. Want of time, 
means, or inclination, to acquire the classical training, which was a condition 
]irecedent to admission into the colleges then existing, excluded many ambitious 
young men from the benefits of higher ediTcation. The Institute sought to 
remedy this by establishing a progressive course of scientific and technical 
education upon which those of more limited elementary preparation could enter. 
This general idea by natural process of growth and development has budded 
forth in the course of the years into a scientific, technical, and military college, 
characterized by thoroughness of instruction and exact military dicipline, which 
is known, recognized and honored throughout the length and l)readth of the 
whole territory of the republic. 

We have seen that at the start there were, only two permanent instructors, 
and that during the second year, and for some years thereafter, indeed until 
1846, helji was rendered by Professor Armstrong, of Washington College. In 
1841 the growth of the school necessitated the appointment of another per- 
manent instructor, although there were scant means for his support. In the 
spring of 1841, Thos. II. Williamson, Esq. — Old Toui of blessed memory — 
was elected professor of military and civil engineering, instructor of drawing, 
and he relieved the sujDerintendent of the duties of commandant of cadets and 
instructor of tactics. Thus was provided a course of engineering for the first 
class to be graduated from the Institute, in 1842. Professor Williamson was 
born in Norfolk, Va., a scion of an old and honored family. Having been 
taught in the best schools of his native city, he was appointed a cadet of the 
U. S. Military Academy in 1829, and pursued the usual course of study there 
until 1833, when he resigned before graduation, to enter ujaon the profession 
of civil engineering. His first service was imder Colonel Baldwin, the engineer 
in charge of the V. S. Naval Dry Dock at Norfolk. Thereafter he was con- 
tinuously engaged in various works of internal improvement in the state and 
brought to the school the varied experience which his long service had given 
him in railroads, canals, and other large constructions. His taste and skill in 
drawing added to his fitness for this part of his professional duties, while his 
military education at West Point gave him special qualifications for the de- 
partment of tactics. In 1846 the board of visitors organized the department 



of natural and exi3erlniental philosophy, chemistry, mineralogy, and geology, 
and Lient. William Gilham, U. S. Army, then serving with General Taylor's 
army in Mexico, was elected to the chair. He was also made commandant of 
cadets and instrnctor of tactics, relieving Major Williamson, overbnrdened with 
work in his own department, of these dnties. Professor Gilham, of Virginia 
parentage, was born in Indiana, in 1836 ; he was appointed a cadet at the U. S. 
Military Academy from that state. He was graduated m 1840 and appointed 
lieutenant in the 3rd Regiment U. S. Artillery. In September, 1841, he was 
appointed assistant professor of natural and exfierimental philosophy at West 
Point and discharged the duties of this office until September, 1844. He served 
as adjutant of the 3rd Regiment of Artillery at the battles of Palo Alto and 
Resaca de la Palma, May, 1846. The experience of three years as assistant pro- 
fessor of natural philosophy at West Point, and his services with the army in 
Mexico, gave Major Gilham peculiar advantages in his new duties, and his 
department was soon placed in full and effective working order. Was there 
ever a cadet who knew Old Gil., who did not love him ? 

In 1842 some of the classes of cadets were examined before the legislature. 
This body was so impressed with the proficiency of the scholars, the system and 
methods of instruction, that by the Act of March, 1842, the normal feature was 
impressed iipon the school, and the state cadets were required to teach two 
years in Virginia after graduation. The state was in some need of competent 
and efficient teachers for the instruction of the growing youth of the land. The 
calling of teacher was to some extent contemned and depreciated by educated 
young men of the South. Even now, although the honorable and beneficial 
character of this calling is universally recognized, the very inadequate pro- 
^'ision made for those who adopt it deprives it' of the services of the best men. 
In the course of the years the Institute sent into the field of education a notable 
corps of accomplished teachers. Among the earlier teachers who won for them- 
selves honor and distinction were : Strange, Forbes, Wills, Bryan, Nelson. 
Downes, Pitts, Simpson, Wheelwright, Hill, Powell, Duke, Pendleton, Derby, 
Council], Gamble, Fristoe, Gatewood, Morrisett, Stuart, Harris, Blankenship, 
Hall, Murfee, Phillips, Lane, Edgar, Lightfoot, Wine, Wyatt, Todd, and a 
host of others whom it is not necessary to name. This list is continuallv in- 
creasing with honored names. Comparati^-ely few of those who won distinc- 
tion as teachers remained long in the calling, for it was not remunerative, and 
these able and accomplished young men gradually drifted into more active life, 
where a wider field gave play for their ambition. 




fiRNKRAi, Scott Shipp 




General Edwarp W. Kichols 



Tho moral feature added to the school made it advisable to substitute the 
Latin for the German language. This made the burden of Major Preston's 
chair greater than one man could bear, and in 1846 he was relieved from the 
French language; this was assigned to R. E. Colston as assistant professor. 
Professor Colston, son of Dr. Colston, of Fauquier County, Virginia, was born 
in Paris, France. He entered the Virginia Military Institute in 1843, and 
was graduated in 1846. While a cadet he had been detailed to assist in in- 
struction of French language, of which he was an accomplished master. He 
served as assistant jjrofessor until 1853, when he was made instructor with 
increased rank and pay; and finally in 1855 he was made full professor, and 
was also apjjointed in 1860 professor of military history and strategy. He 
was a very accomplished scholar and soldier, and commanded a division of 
Jackson's corps in the ever memorable flank attack made on Hooker's right on 
May 2d, 1863. In this attack many V. M. I. men took part. Eodes and 
Colston commanded two of the three divisions ; Crutchfield was chief of artillery 
of Jackson's corps ; Tom Carter, of Hill's division ; Moorman commanded a 
battery; Munford, a regiment of cavalry; Lane, a brigade of infantry; the 
list of field and compan}- officers is too long to name, and the apprehension in 
writing merely from memory is that many who should be with those named 
have been omitted. When one comes to deal with V. M. I men, the names of 
those who have attained high distinction make a formidable roll. 

By 1S51 the continued growth of the school made it iiecessary to relieve 
the overburdened commandant of cadets of a part of his professional duties, 
and the department of natural and experimental philosophy and astronomy 
was constituted an independent department, and Lieutenant and Brevet-Major 
Thomas J. Jackson 1st LT. S. Artillery, was called to the new chair. Major 
Jackson was a graduate of West Point in the class of 1846. The Mexican 
War was then in progress. Jackson was at once ordered to join the army that 
General Scott was organizing for the invasion of ]\Iexico and the capture of 
their capital city. He joined as brevet second lieutenant. In one year's time 
he had attained the actual rank of first lieutenant and the brevet rank of major, 
having served with his battery in the siege of the fortress of San Juan D-tHloa 
at Vera Cruz, at Cerro Gordo, and had greatly distinguished himself at Con- 
truss, Chnrubusco, and Chapidtapec. After peace was definitely concluded 
by the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, he was ordered back to the states, 
and stationed at Fort Hamilton, jSTew York Harbor. From there he went to 
Fort Dade near Tampa, on the west coast of Florida. From that place he 





New JIaktckt Statue 



came to the Institute in the summer of 1851. He said to a friend that he knew 
war to be his true vocation ; that while campaigning was congenial to his taste, 
the routine of garrison duties in time of peace was distasteful to him ; that if 
a war should occur, he would return to the army. He further said that the 
fact that the Institiate was a military school, and that he was to he instructor 
of artillery tactics, also of ordnance and science of gunnery, the more inclined 
him to accept the position tendered him. On Sunday, the 21st day of April, 
1861, in obedience to orders from the governor of the state, he marched from 
the Institute in command of the battalion of cadets, under orders to report for 
duty in Richmond; the commandant of cadets, Major Gilham, had been previ- 
ously ordered to Eichmond, and Jackson was left as senior in command. Thus 
with his God-given genius for war, his moral and christian ^'irtue and heroism, 
he entered upon a career of glory which in two brief years overshadowed this 
land, and even went beyond the seas and reached the uttermost parts of the 
earth. In May, 1863, his mortal remains were brought to Lexington. They 
lay in state in his old classroom, and thence borne on a caisson of the battery 
he had so long commanded, escorted by the battalion of cadets, they were laid 
away in the quiet little village graveyard to await the resurrection of God. 
His name and fame, of course the most brilliant in the amuils of the Institute, 
and second only to those of Washington and Lee in the annals of the Com- 
monwealth, shed imperishable lustre upon this Institute, in which he faithfully 
served for ten years, from the twenty-seventh to the thirty-seventh years of 
his age. 

In the autumn of 1859, Gen. P. St. George Cocke gave the Institute 
$20,000.00 to endow in part a chair of agriculture. Dr. William Newton 
Mercer gave $10,000.00 to endow in part a chair of animal and vegetable 
physiology; and W. B. Claytor, of Lynchburg, gave $5,000.00 toward the 
erection of a suitable science building, as a memorial of his son, a graduate of 
the Institute — an accomplished young engineer who had been untimely cut 
oft' in the prime of his youthful ])romise in 1800. Major Gilham was apjiointed 
])rofessor of agriculture and geology ; Dr. E. K. Madison, professor of physi- 
ology, and surgeon ; M. B. Hardin, a distinguished graduate of the class of 1858, 
at the time serving as assistant professor, was made adjunct professor of 
chemistry, with a view to his succeeding to the professorship ; Captain Stapleton 
Crutchfield, an assistant professor, was made adjunct professor of mathematics. 
Crutchfield was a man of genius. He served as chief of artillery of Jackson's 
army corps; he was wounded at Chancelloi-sville, and was hauled off that 



bloody field in the same ambidance with his mighty chief. He recovered, re- 
turned to his command, and was killed at Sailoi-s' Creek, a few days before the 
surrender on the fateful field of Appomattox. When Major Gilham, the 
commandant, was made professor of agriculture, it was determined to constitute 
a separate military department, combining the duties of commandant of cadets, 
instructor of infantry, artillery and cavalry tactics, instruction in ordnance 
and gunnery, military history, and strategy. These duties had heretofore been 
distributed amongst three officers. Major Gilham, Jackson, and Colston. The 
war came on and the InstitTite was for a time closed, every officer being in the 
field, before this purpose was finally accomplished. 

Thus in the couree of twenty years, the Institute, starting as a small 
academy, with only two instructors, had blossomed forth into a fully organized 
and equipped military, scientific and technical institution of the first rank. 
Her graduates had made their mark. Among the number were to be found 
men prominent in all the professions. The defect of which the ]iresident of 
Brown University had complained had been supplied. Some of the most 
eminent engineers in the south — Jordan, Rodes, Mahone, Rives, Winfree, 
Robinson, Wall, and a long list of others — were Institute men. Throughout 
the history of the school some of its graduates had won for themselves distinc- 
tion at the bar, among whom may be named Pendleton, Garnett, Dorman, 
W. W. Gordon of ante bellum days, and Alexander Hamilton, of Petersburg, 
Va., Francis L. Smith, of Alexandria, "N^a., of recent times. The two gentle- 
men last named were prominent members of the constitutional convention. 
Mr. Hamilton, moreover, is first vice-president and general counsel of a great 
trunk line railway, and served for many years as president of the board of 
visitors of the Institute. 

Until 1860 the privileges of the Institute were open only to Virginians. 
The demand for admission from those outside of the state could be met only 
by the increase of barrack accommodations, and this was not accomplished 
until 1860. Then came the great War. At its outbreak the Institute had 
graduated only nineteen classes, four hundred and ele^'en men. A considerably 
larger number had profited by the instruction of the Institute for a greater 
or less length of time. All cadets and graduates were instrumental in organiz- 
ing, drilling, and instructing the raw volunteers. At the camps of instruction 
at Richmond, Camp Lee, the whole corps of cadets, after April 21, 1861, were 
engaged in these important duties. In this camp were troops from all the 
southern states, and many thousand passed through this instruction. One by 



one the cadets were eoniiiiissioned in the various arms of the service, and the 
corjDS gradually disintegrated. In ]S(i2, upon the urgent earnest representa- 
tion of the Confederate War Department, the governor of Virginia ordered 
the school to be reorganized, as the necessity for trained officers for the armies 
became more and more urgent. The dejiartnieut detached officers of the In- 
stitute from their dnties in the field, with the exception of Jackson, whose 
services with the army conld not be dispensed with. During the war cadets 
were about twelve uKinths in active service in the field and althongh engaged 
in only one pitched battle, in which they won fur themselves and their Alma 
Mater imjierishable renown, they were at other times under fire. At the bloody 
battle of McDowell, May, 1862, under the command of Stonewall Jackson, 
the battalion of cadets constituted, with the Stonewall Brigade, part of the 
reserve. At Lynchbura:, thev were imder fire, but not ena-ased. At niohtfall 




Bahkacks Ai-tek HrxTHit's Raid 

of the night that Hunter retired, cadets were assigned to a post of honor as 
support of a battery in a square redoubt, which had been vigoroirsly assailed 
during the day. Renewal of the assaidt was anticipated in the early morning. 
When day dawned, with mingled feelings of relief and regret, it was ascertained 
that Hunter, with an army greatly outnundjering that of Early, had \-anished 
in the night. It was this Hunter who a few days before had burned the In- 
stitute, destroying the barrack, arsenal, library, a])paratus and officers" quarters. 
This was no doubt justifiable as an act df war, luit it is hoped that the Con- 
gress of the ITnited States, recognizing the valor of the j'outhful soldiers and 
the ])rcs('iit worth (if the Institution to the whole country in the interest of 
military efficiency and defence, may reimburse the loss. This, while magnan- 



imous, would he at the same time proper and just. Some of the money which 
is aminally wasted in building naval stations and docks in harbors where 
there is not water enough to float a ship into the dock, after it has been built, 
would be more pTOfitablv exjoended in repairing the waste of war at this Institu- 
tion. 

VIRGINIA MILITARY I«"STITrTE 
1861 1908. 

In the spring of '61, when the storm of civil war burst upon our country, 
the Virginia ]\Iilitary Institute was earnestly at work develoj^ing along the 
lines laid out for it by its founders. The impending struggle was to be the 
sui^renie test of how well had been planned and carried out the conception of 
an institution for the all-round education of the young men connnitted to its 
care, in physical development, mental culture, and moral uplift, welded into 
truest manhood. At this hour of supreme need, these young men, because of 
the training and disciiDline gained here, were a potential factor in training the 
army of the South to resist invasion and strike a telling blow for liberty. In 
1861, on April 21st, under the command of the immortal Jackson, the corjjs of 
cadets reported at Camp Lee, Richmond, Va., and were at once set to work 
to drill and discipline the volunteers and recruits being mobilized there, and 
which were the nucleus of the greatest army the world has ever seen. How 
efficient was this work, the achievements of the succeeding months would show. 
But the necessity for properly equipped and trained officers was so urgent that 
in January, 1862, by order of the Governor of Virginia, the school was re- 
opened, all of the officers being ordered back, except General Jackson, who could 
not be spared from the front. Many members of the corps who went to Rich- 
mond in the spring of '61 had been commissioned officers in the army, and 
from time to time during the succeeding three yeai-s many cadets resigned 
from the Institute and joined the army in the field. 

Of the corps at the Institute during the civil war I would especially speak. 
There was always a feeling of unrest in the corps, and the boys were only re- 
strained from joining the army by positive parental command. In the veins of 
these young men was jjulsing the blood of noble sires, many of whom were in the 
field. On the altar of these youthful hearts brightly burned the fires of patriot- 
ism, and their deepest conviction was the nobility of sacrifice for country. Yet 
all duties were conscientiously performed, rigorous drill, exacting guard duty, 
and studies. The light-heartedness of youth was in evidence, yet it had a 



sombre lining, as if the bovs ajjpreciated fnlly the great gravity of the death 
gra])]>le in which their conntrv was engaged. These boys were disciplined and 
made hardy also by learning the sjjirit of self-sacrilice and self-conti'ol. Of 
necessity food was scarce and of the plainest kind, yet never a mnrnmr was 
heard. Located as the Institute was in the Valley of Virginia, the cadet corps 
formed a reserve force, though small, to be called on in any emergency, and a 
number of times, in march and bivouac, they manifested the real spirit and 
endurance of the true soldier. At McDowell, under the eye of Jackson himself, 
they formed a part of the line of reserves. In December, '64, enduring freezing 
weather, the corps went on the Goshen march, Averill at that time raiding 
through the western ]iart of the state. But it was in May, '64, that the cadet 
cor])s was ordered to join the forces of Breckenridge at Staunton, and a few 
days later, on May 15th, took a conspicuous part in the bloody and hotly con- 
tested battle of ~New Market, defeating the forces of Gen. Franz Siegel, thereby 
earning glorious renown for their country and the school, whose teaching and 
training and discipline were here so grandly illustrated. In this battle the corps 
of cadets was made Tip of four comjjanies of infantry, numbering 220, and a 
section of artillery, 30 men and two 3-inch rifled parrot guns, under com- 
mand of Col. Scott Shipp. The casualties of the corps in this battle were 
8 killed and 48 wounded in the infantry ; none in the artillery. Of the con- 
duct of the corps in this battle. General Echols said in an ofBeial order May 
16th, to Colonel Shipp, "I shall always be proud to have had you and your 
corps under my command ; no man ever had a more gallant band ; nobly have 
you illustrated the history of your state and the great Institution you have 
represented" ; and in an address after the war, "Earth has never witnessed a 
more imjDressi^-e scene than presented by those boys as they moved unflinchingly 
forward under fire." Capt. Franklin E. Town, U. S. Army, who witnessed 
the conduct of the cadets under fire, said, "I don't believe the history of war 
contains the record of a deed more chivalrous, more daring, or, more honorable, 
than the charge of these boys to a victory that veterans might well boast of. I 
never witnessed a more gallant advance and final charge than were given by 
these boys on that field ; they fought like veterans, nor did the dropping of their 
comrades by the ruthless bullet deter them from their mission, but on they 
came ; ravines, or fences, or shot, or shell, were all the same to these brave 
boys, who faltered not, vmtil they waved their battle-flag over the captured 
battery of Capt. Von Kleiser." Of the martyred boys who fell, Atwell, Cabell. 
Crockett, Jefferson, Jones, McDowell, Stanard, and Wheelwright, it has been 



1i:iii2.]y said, "How could they have achieved in a long life a fame more noble 
au.d more pure than that which now glorifies their names '. Pond as the laurel 
or bay around the head of the warrior or the poet, but amarinthine, like that 
of God's martyrs, is the crown that liberty places upon the brows, flushed with 
immortal youth, of these, her boy defenders, who offered their virgin lives 
upon her altar." 

Following the battle of Xew Market, the corps went to Eichmond, 
where the people and Government, both Conferedate and State, showed the 
highest appreciation of the way in which the corps had distinguished itself. The 
corps then returned to Lexington, and was under fire when Hunter in his raid 
up the valley aj^proached the town. Eetreat was imperative because the corps 
was overwhelmingly outnumbered by the Federals. It fell back to Lynchburg, 
and was subsequently furloughed. Hunter destroyed the barracks, the library, 
the professors' houses, and all apparatus belonging to the institution. By reason 
of the services rendered the state and the confederacy by this institution, this 
was deemed by the Federal authorities a justifiable war measure. 

\\\ the autumn of '64 we find the corps doing duty on the lines below Rich- 
mond, and in December of that year, academic duties were resumed, the cade^-s 
being quarterd in the city almshouse. Time and again, when some emergency 
arose, the cadets would be ordered out. In the spring of '65, when Eichmond 
was evacuated, the cadet corps left the city, going up the James river canal 
and was disbanded after the surrender of General Lee. The Institute fur- 
nished to the Confederate Army during the Civil War: jour Major Generals, 
iiceniy Brigadier-Generals, eighty Colonels, seventy-one Lieutenant-Colonels, 
ninety-nine Majors, one hundred and seventy Captains, and innumerable 
Lieutenants; to the Federal Army: one Brigadier-General, one Colonel, two 
Lieutenant-Colonels, one Major, three Lieutenants, one iSTavy Surgeon. These 
last were cadets who had come from north of "Mason and Dixon's line," and 
went with their own section, but never wavered in loyalty to their Alma Mater, 
as proven by their statements after the Avar. 

When the Civil War ended, the future of the Institute indeed looked 
hopeless, but in the autumu of '66 cadets were again matriculated, 
and the good work stopped at the end of the war was resumed. Temporary 
cabins were erected imtil the old barracks could be rebuilt, as only the walls 
were left standing after being burned by Hunter. In the restoration of bar- 
racks and the professors' quartei-s, $300,000 were expended, imposing a burthen 
of debt, which was patiently borne, and which by the wise business raanage- 

37 



inent of Gen. Francis H. Smith, and his successor, Gen. Scott Shipp, has now 
been liquidated. Of course there was an annual appropriation by the state, 
but the state was left by the war almost bankrupt, all of its resources being- 
crippled, and General Smith had need to exert in the restoration of the Institute 
all of the ability, financial skill, and sacrificing devotion, which characterized 
his management in the founding and development of the school prior to the 
Civil War. The increasing infirmities of age obliged General Smith to resign in 
July, 1889, to take eft'ect January 1st, 1S90, and Col. Scott Shipp, who for 
many years had been the accomplished commandant of cadets, was elected to 
succeed him. To this responsible work he brought ability for finance, skill in 
administration and devoted self-sacrifice, for which the Institute owes him a 
lasting debt of gratitude. Under his wise and judicious management the In- 
stitute has been started on a career of usefulness scarcely dreamed of before. 
In the process of development $250,000 has been expended. Up to July 1st, 
1909, there will have been a total expenditure of $620,000, of which amount 
$125,000 have been contributed by the state. It is very apparent, therefore, 
what rigid economy and administrative ability have been necessary. An ac- 
cademic building has been put up as a memorial to Gen. Francis H. Smith; 
laboratories have been built and equipped with apparatus ; barracks enlarged to 
accommodate the increasing number of cadets ; a new library building has been 
erected ; the mess hall, which was burned, rebuilt and improved ; and a heating 
and lighting plant installed. After a service of fifty years as cadet, Com- 
mandant and Superintendent, General Shipp resigned, in July, 1907. Gen. 
Edward W. Nichols, who had for many years been the accomi>lished and bril- 
liant Professor of Mathematics, was appointed acting Superintendent, and in 
June, 1908, he was elected Superintendent. He has brought to the discharge 
of the important duties of the office a keen appreciation of the needs of the 
Institute, and under his wise administration the future is big with promise of 
increased usefulness and success. 

When the Spanish- American war came on in 1S9S, the old V. M. I. 
was found well rej^resented in the volunteer forces by many officers, 
one Brigadier-General, five Colonels, two Lieutenant-Colonels, nine Majors, 
twenty-seven Captains, and a long list of first and second lieutenants. In 
June, 1903, a memorial monument, commemorative of the Ifew Market Corps, 
was unveiled ; it stands near the arch of the Jackson Memorial Hall. It is 
the work of Sir Moses Ezekiel, an alumnus of the Institute, and one of the 
jSTew Market Corps, and was the gift of the alumni and friends of the Institute, 



Sir Moses Ezekiel donating his work on the statue '"Virginia Mourning Her 
Dead." In prominent position, civic and professional, the graduates of the 
Institute have been conspicuous ; indeed it may be said, go into any commimity, 
and the men who have been trained in this school will measure up to the 
standard of any other institution in the efficient discharge of the duties and 
obligations of life. The education in this School is well rounded, physically, 
mentally and morally ; it is the internal qualifications of the man that count, not 
externa] fortune or environment prior to entrance into the ranks of the corjM. 
He is taught honor from every standpoint, honesty of purpose, fidelity to dtity, 
and is fitted to deal with the problems of life when he leaves, with the stamp 
of her commendation "well done." The feeling of fraternity between the men 
who have been cadets, no matter whether in the same class or corps or not, is 
very remarkable, reminding one of the fraternity of some great order. Love 
for, and loyalty to, the Institute are a part of the very warp and woof of the 
make-up of her alumni, and only end with life itself. 

J. X. Upshur. 

Class '64. 




Adjusting the Tuaxsit 



The Class of 1909 



Coi-OES : Purple and White 

T. M, SCOTT President 

W. M. RHETT Vice-President 

J. W. HOBSOX Secretary and Treasurer 

T. JI. SCOTT Valedictorian 

B. D. MAYO Historian 




7 



Matriculated 1906; Marshal Final Ball; 
Marshal Final Gern^an ; Sub Basket-ball 
Team ( 1 ) ; Private Company "A" ; Class 
Football Team ( 1 ) ; Class Baseball Team 
(1 

Geologically speaking. "Freddy" is a 
metamorphosed specimen — changed by the 
heat of love, and changed completely. His 
whole sentimental nature was aroused in 
the short space of one hop, and this was 
followed by his expulsion from the club 
of women-haters. He is a romantic lover 
— nothing but bars and chaing can re- 
strain him from his ladj'. Thereby hangs 
a tale. He was happy until he forced the 
encounter with Cupid, but since then he 
has suffered all the penalties which fol- 
low in the wake of such struggle. But 
still he dreams and dreams, and devours 
JlcCutcheon's every work. 



George Mukbell Alexander 
Lynchburg, Va. 

Hack, Alex, Ttoo-Spot 

And u-ho shall place a limit to the giant's 
unchained strength? 

Matriculated 190.5; Private Company 
"D" (4); Corporal Company "C" (3)": 
Sergeant Company "A" (2) ; First Lieu- 
tenant Company "D" ( 1 ) ; Football Team 
( 2 ) , ( 1 ) ; Gymnasium Team ( 3 ) . ( 2 j . 
( 1 ) ; Captain Gymnasium Team ( 1 ) ; 
Marshal Final Ball; Marshal Final Ger- 
man ; Editor-in-Chief of the Cadet ; Pres- 
ident of the Episcopal Club ; President of 
Press Club; Official Score-keeper Baseball. 

"Hack," named for Hackinschmidt, the 
giant wrestler, is reputed to be the strong- 
est^ man at V. M. I. Adored bj' the "Cal- 
ics," who can't resist his many charms 
— the crowning one his two white spots. 
"Tliey feel so safe when with ilr. Alex- 
ander." Called "Rubber" by messmates, 
for obvious reasons. True exponent cf 
Dr. Ozone. Has an unlimited capacity for 
cussing out the Cadet, also the "Gym " 
when not prime." and tor biting e;irs. 




I^if^^ 



-o^gt 



Olin Beall Barkes 
Snow Hill, Md. 

Lucy, Harney, Lucky 

^yolllan! Oh, that ne might fall into her 
arms without falling into her hands! 

Matriculated 1904; Private Company 
"B" (4), (3), (2); Private Company "A" 
( 1 ) ; Member Class Football and Baseball 
Teams ( 3 ) ; Scrubs ( 1 ) ; Marshal Final 
Ball ( 2 ) ; Marshal Final German ( 1 ) . 

This individual came into barracks in 
September. 1904, and remained in our 
midst a little over three years; at the 
end of which time he resigned for the 
lienefit of his health. Returning in Fall 
of '08 he became a member of Class of 
'09, and is putting forth every effort to 
capture a "dip" in the Engineering De- 
partment, and wrenches every day for a 
max. ( ?) under Col. Tommy. Is a great 
"Calics" man, and is a shining light with 
the Lexington belles. 



George H. Brett 
Cleveland, 0. 

Old Pu, Jimmy, George 

The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand 
that rules the world. 

Matriculated 1906; Private Company 
"D"; First Sergeant Company "C"; Cap- 
tain Company "C" ; Marshal Final Ball ; 
Marshal Final German ; Official Scorer of 
Basket-ball Team. 

"Sunny .Jim," or the man with the smil- 
ing countenance and the cackle of a hen, 
came to V. M. I. to learn the art of War. 
In his rat year he had a monopoly' on 
orderlies at guard mount, and wore out 
numerous pairs of shoes walking to and 
from Vanover's. Consequently he is one 
of the big four. According to his testi- 
mony, has traveled extensivelj', and is often 
heard to say, "When I was in England." 
May be seen almost any time scanning 
the advertising section of a- magazine for 
some voice lubricator. Is often troubled 
J with "writers' cramp" on account of the 
numerous letters he writes to the fair sex. 



«^ 







Louis X. Bbitton 
Vicksburg, Miss. 

Jimmie, Crazy Ed, Imboden 

Hen are hut children of larger growth. 

Matriculated 1904; Private Company 
"C" (4) ; Private Company "B" (3), (2) ; 
Private Company "D" (2) ; Military Sec- 
retary ( 1 ) ; Marshal Final Ball ; Marshal 
Final German ; Chairman Finance Com- 
mittee First Class Banquet; G^njinasium 
Team ( 3 ) . ( 2 ) , ( 1 ) ; Hop Committee ( 1 ) ; 
Art Editor Bomb; Cadet Staff; Leader 
Jlandolin Club. 

"Imboden" is a typical example of an 
institute-raised boy. When he came here 
he was about "knee-high to a grasshop- 
per." He is now a little higher than that. 
Therefore he has been raised. He landed 
here fondlj' clasping a mandolin case in 
one arm and a little "satchel" in the 
other. He is now chiefly concerned over 
the appearance of his ilajesty's shoes and 
getting the delinquencies on time. He can 
be heard almost any time at class parade 
shouting, "Ugh! Ugh! Shine 'em up! 
Shine 'em up!" 



^ 



l.i 






EdWAKD ilANNING BURACKER 

Baltimore, Md. 

Eddie Boo 

Apollo clothed in bear skin. 

Matriculated 1905; Private Company 
"A" ; Corporal Company "D" ; Sergeant 
Major; Adjutant; Marshal Final Ball; 
Marshal Final German; Gymnasium 
Team (2), (1); Basket-ball Team (1); 
Class Football Team ( 1 ) ; Track Team 

■ (4). 

From a "rat" in "A" Company with an 
eccentric step to Cadet-Adjutant with the 
same eccentricity and zero demerits, is the 
history of this product of Lexington Mar- 
ket. Nothing has ever disturbed his re- 
markable equanimity except demerits and 
Francis Cameron's famous waltz. "Eddie" 
reached the climax of his fame when he 
starred in the Gym exhibit. His various 
falls from the rings and bar did not pre- 
vent his holding an important position in 
the pyramid. L'ndoubtedly the athlete has 
a kissable mouth, and it has even been 

L necessary for some unfortunates to "call 

-i papa." 




'i>4=^ 



Hamilton B. Caskie 
Bedford City, Va. 

Casey, Caskitus, Mademoiselle 




Better alone than in iad company. 

Matriculated 1904 ( ?) ; Private Com- 
pany "C" (4), (3), (2), (1); Marshal 
Final Ball; Marshal Final German; Mem- 
ber Founder's Club. 

This mincing bit of femininity entered 
the Institute son;e\vhere in the Dark Ages 
when men resembled monkeys and lived 
on cocoanuts. She was the venerable 
founder of the Founder's Club, and has 
actually became a fixture; that is to say, 
a College Widow, to the Institute. 
Strange to say, this member of the gentler 
sex has a most weird conception of nature, 
for although from the country she posi- 
tively states that she has often seen 
rabbits in the act of climbing trees, and 
a certain species of cat winging its odor- 
ous flight among the clouds. "It can't 
talk." 




mm. 



Bruce J. Downey 
Alexandria, Va. 

Bruce 

Lo, he is strong! 

Matriculated 1905; Private Company 
"A" (41: Corporal Company "D" (3); 
Private Companv "D" (2). (1); diss 
Football Team "(3): Scrub (4), (2): 
Gymnasium Team ( 1 ) ; Marshal Final 
Ball; Marshal Final German. 

Another production of Alexandria, 
where grass grows in the street. "Briice" 
is as agile as a cat and naturally a star 
— nay, the whole solar system — in the 
Gym; and when in the act of turning an 
air flip he presents an aspect not unlike 
that of an eel. At parade he can outstrut 
a peacock, especially when the parade 
giound is infested by "■Calic." He walks 
mainly by means of his shoulders, which, 
by the way, are simply tremendous. The 
Calic term "Bruce" "eute," but we think 
that this epithet applies only to "Luce." 
Aw, now, Bruce! 



HoBEKT Elliott Doyle 
Richmond, Va. 

Hohy, Spike, String 

Lean not on a reed. 

Matriculated U)05 ; Private Company 
"B" (4), (3) ; Private Companv "D" (2), 
(1); Marshal Final Ball; Marshal Final 
German ; Banquet Committee. 

"Hoby" also hails from the fair me- 
tropolis, and is officially known as "Cutie" 
by the girls of Richmond, Although small 
in diameter he can eat more than any two 
men in school, and has a great affinity for 
men with long names. He knows every 
tie of the C, & O, road irom Richmond to 
Cincinnati, and hopes to be a railroad 
magnate some day. We all have our weak 
points, and his is in spelling. Was known 
to spell right "wright" and wrong "rong" 
in the law section one day. But with all 
his faults he is one of the good fellows 
of '09. 




,'^\ 




Charles Henry Drayton 

Charleston, S. C. 
Bhie Eyes, C'leo, Euli-Kuh 
Eyes tcith the same bJiie icifchery as those 
of Psyche. 

Matriculated 1904; Private Company 
"C" (4), (3), (2), (1); Marshal Final 
Ball ; Leader of Final German ; Class 
Football Team (3), (2), (1) ; Class Base- 
ball Team ( 3 ) , ( 2 ) ; Dramatic Club ( 2 ) , 
(1); Glee Club (2), (1); Color Guard; 
Class Ring Committee. 

Charlie has become one of the old In- 
stitute landmarks, joining the ''Founder's 
Club" in his third class year. The highest 
ambition of his life is to "put on the dog," 
and he is a true sport. No one can stop 
him from being a regailar "old tit." Will 
probably be found, after this year, on the 
Battery in the "Exclusive City," with a 
monacie and walking stick, and an ac- 
cented "don't-cher-know." True to those 
he likes and to — with those he don't. 
Charlie's cunning ways take with the 
"Calics," and there lies the tale of "Blue 
Eyes." 



Lewis H. Ellison 
Norfolk, Va. 

Elite, Dynamo, Poo-Poo 

And sleep in spite of thunder. 

Matriculated 1905; Private Company 
"D" (4), (3). (2), (1); Marshal Final 
German. 

The above are the only nicknames which 
the handsome and noble lad. shown in the 
accompanying picture, possesses. As his 
picture would seem to indicate, he re- 
sembles a fly-wheel or a dynamo. He is 
one of "Dink's" favorite voltameters, and 
and is never so happy as when he forms 
a part of an electric circuit. Hails from 
the City of Norfolk, where he hopes, by 
his great electrical genius, to turn the 
town wrong side out and up side down, 
in an attempt to bring his name into the 
hall of fame, or notoriety. 







"C"; Corporal Company "A"; Sergeant 
Company "D"; Second Lieutenant Com- 
pany "D"; Marshal Final Ball; Marshal 
Final German; Cadet Staff. 

Long and hopeless hours of gazing into 
the mirror have only resulted in embit- 
tering his heart against the manufacturers 
of Herpicide, for slowly, but surely, his 
silken strands are plucked by each pass- 
ing breeze. His dreams of beauty have 
fled. As a friend, Roger is as faithful as 
his head is bald, but ill fares the man 
who incurs the disfavor of this intense 
Carolinian. How comforting that words 
are harmless! To the misfortune of the 
literary world this genius has chosen for 
his life-work the manufacture of ging- 
hams. He aspires to the honor of being 
the first man in "09 to enter the servile 
condition of matrimonv. 



Oscar Ievin Gates 
Fort Smith, Ark. 

Old Woman, Oscie 

That kindest man, the uest conditioned, 
and xinuearied spirit, in doing cour- 



,-V1 



Matriculated 1006; Sergeant Company 
"A" ( 2 ) : Baseball ( 2 ) ; Marshal Final 
Ball (2); Football (1); Marshal Final 
German ( 1 ) ; Class Football ( 2 ) ; Base- 
ball ( 1 ) ; Hop Committee ; Assistant 
Business Manager Bomb. 

Here we have a man who can be recog- 
nized in the distance by his beaming 
countenance; for the "Old Woman" has 
an inexhaustible supply of smiles. This 
"Queen of Belles" came to us as a third- 
class rat from Arkansas, and hardly had 
"Oscie" arrived until nearly every third 
classman fell in love witli his angelic, 
smiling features. When asked as to any 
important question the "Old Woman" 
springs out with, "I'll swear to it." With 
all this, we are very grateful to the Slow 
Train that passed "through Arkansas and 
made the Institute the final stop for our 
•i"Oscie." 



Jil^ 



//' 




^J__ 



'"Sallie" oiu-e tried reconstruction of 
tlie U. S. Drill Refiulations by taking off 
his hat when the national air was being 
played, but he never quite succeeded in 
doing so. We are sori-y, girls, but you 
haven't a chance with this red-headed 
gentleman. "Sallie" thinks that the world 
is not as it should be, so he has about 
decided to become a missionary. It is 
not known definitely where he will take 
up his work, but from the way he talks 
he has about decided to convert the 
heathen Chinee first. 



Hekkkbt Alwyn Jacob 
Kichmond, Va. 

■fuL<: llilhi BriKj, Gas Bag 
Thai I'.s- irrll spoken irlnch is (fell takoi. 

ilatriculated lilO.i: Private Company 
"B": First Corporil Company "C"; Left 
(iuidc Company "A": First Sergeant Com- 
pany ■■!>": Captain Company "B"; As- 
sistant -Manager Football Team; Manager 
Football Team; ilarshal Final Ball; Mar- 
shal Final (Jeruian; Historian "Summer 
School"; Class Ba.seball Team. 

"Jacob" was run out of Richmond when 
he was one of the bad boys of the "Monroe 
Park Gang." On account of his ability 
as an orator he has finally rose to be 
corporal of the gang. But since entering 
this reformatory all of his faults have 
been corrected, with the exception that he 
still persists in reading about "Maude" 
in the "funny papers." Lynchburg is his 
happy hunting ground. Ever since he 
acted assistant leader to "Miss Chuck" in 
the Summer School's final ball, his great- 
est ambition has been to learn to dance. 



VA 



Eugene L. Lindsey 
Alexandria, Va. 

Red, Pink-tchisl.crs. Crimson Rambler 

Xe'er did Grecidii chisel trace a 2sijmi)h, 
a Xaiad, or a Grace, of fairer form 
or lorelier face. 

ilatvifulated 1905; Private Company 
■■B" (4). (3), (2); Private Company "A" 
( 1 ) ; Marshal Final Ball ; Marshal Final 
German ; Class Football ( 1 ) ; Class Base- 
ball (2). 

This earrot-headed individual hails from 
the town where the cows nibble grass in 
the streets. When yonng he got his cra- 
nium wet, and it rusted; and in his at- 
tempts to remove the rust he caused it 
to take on a pinkish hue. From his face 
there projects a number of pink splinters, 
which he positively will not remove more 
than once a week for fear that the sun 
will freckle his complexion. He is a 
star at church receptions, and can get his 
his money's worth of refreshments and at 
the same time leave a good impression 
on the sisters. 



Robert Wallace McClellan 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

Shorty, Molecule, Mac 

A short mail needs no stool to f/ipc a long 
lubber a box on the ear. 

Matriculated 1905; Private Company 
"C" (4); Corporal Company "B" (3); 
Sergeant Company "B" (2) ; Private Com- 
pany ''B" (1); Marshal Final C4erman; 
Marshal Final Ball; Manager of Gym- 
nasium Team; Dramatic Club (2), (1); 
Glee Club (3), (2), (1). 

Although minute in size, the "little 
fellow," has a voice like a bass horn and 
a laugh like the explosion of a giant 
gasoline engine. His temper exceeds his 
stature by several feet, and he keeps his 
roommates in constant fear that he will 
"bang a chair over their heads." "Pea- 
nut" is a lion among the ladies, and never 
ceases to brag about a sixty-four-page let- 
ter received from one. "Shorty" and his 
laugh are general favorites in barracks. 
His one ambition is to grow taller, and 
his favorite expression is "Hello, Red! — 
I Ha. ha!" 




John Magri'der 
Woodstock, Va. 

John, Mac 

Open the old ciyar-box and let me consider 
awhile. 

Matriculated 1905 ; Private Company 
"A"; Corporal Company "C"; First Ser- 
geant Company "D" ; Captain Company 
"D"; Marshal Final Ball; Assistant 
Leader Final Gierman ; Associate Editor 
Bomb; Associate Editor Cadet; Chairman 
"Court of Honor." 

To say that this creature is wonderful 
is putting it mildly, for he is positively 
phenomenal. "Mac" was analyzed bj' ex- 
perts recently, and found to consist of 
thirty parts brains, sixty-nine parts ap- 
petite and one part sentiment. Those 
sixty-nine parts eating ability are indeli- 
bly written on his rugged face, especially 
when "growley" is served. For the first 
hour after taps each night his one part 
sentiment manifests itself. The fair be- 
ings who reign in his air-castles, however, 
are unhappily deposed at each succeeding 
hop, for "John" is very fickle. 



Braxton Davis JIayo 
Roanoke, Va. 

Davis, Old Man, B. D. 

Young men think old men are fools, and 
old men knoic young men to be so. 

Matriculated 1905; Corporal Company 
"B" ; Sergeant Company "C" ; Private 
Company "C"; Librarian; Class His- 
torian; Bomb Staff; Cadet Staff. 

This equation X = an unknown quan- 
tity was one of a number sent to the 
Institute in the Fall of '05 for Old Nick 
to try his hand in solving. This problem 
has proved to be indeterminate. "Davis" 
is a combination of shark, crabbed old 
bach, and woman-hater, having been 
known to go to town via East Lexington 
to avoid meeting a "Calie." There is still 
some hope for him, however, as lately he 
spends his time admiring feminine beauty 
in the magazines. His max-getting pro- 
clivities are truly proverbial, and he feels 
ery badly rolled when he gets only a 
(.95, and speaks disgustedly of the zip 
tie has made. 



Alvin Mansfield Owsley 

Denton, Tex. =- 

liladam, Fu-Fn, Howsley 

Excellence is never granted man except as 
the reward of lahor. 

Matriculated 1904; Corporal Company 
"A" (3) ; Corporal Company "D" (3) ; 
Secretary of Y. M. C. A. (3) ; First Ser- 
geant Company "A" (2) ; President Final 
Ball (2); Captain Company "A" (1); 
Manager 13asket-ball Team ( 1 ) ; President 
Y. M. C. A. ( 1 ) ; Literary Society ( 1 ) ; 
Cadet Staii' ( 1 ) ; Dramatic Club ( 1 ) ; 
Marshal Final German (1). 

And now we come to the man who be- 
lieves that ''no man can be wise on an 
empty stomach." Is the only man in the 
class who has eaten a meal at every house 
in Lexington. He is ambitious; not con- 
tent with being Captain, he is going to 
study law at Texas, and we shall hear 
from him in the Senate, or in Denton, 
Tex. He is the only superintendent of 
the Mess Hall who hasn't been hit in the 
head with a plate of "growley" and a six- 
dayold biscuit. 



WlLLIAJI T. POAGUE 

Lexington, Va. 

P"3ffyi Bully, Tom 

Perseverance hiiys success. 

Matriculated 1904; Corporal Company 
"C"; Sergeant Company "A"; First Ser- 
geant Company "B"; Sergeant Company 
"A" ; Lieutenant Company ''B" ; Marshal 
Final Ball, '07-'08; Football (4), (3), 
(2), (2), (1); Captain (1); Marshal 
Final fterman ; Vice-President Class, '08, 
(3), (2). 

Poague was so unfortunate as to have 
been born in Lexington, but swears he'll 
move out when he graduates. When will 
this be? Is distingiiished as having held 
every office in the battalion once. "Bully" 
claims never to have been in love, yet 
there is something wrong with a man who 
will drive to Buena Vista in a snow storm. 
He took Chemistry, because it afforded 
lietter opportunities for sleeping in the 
afternoons. Poagiie is a born football 
jilayer, and is happiest when he is scrim- 
maging witli his roommates. 



.-«* 




His nickname implies no noisy qimlities. 
for lie lias the most diunitiecl, calmest and 
quietest demeanor imaginable. Beneath 
that calm exterior, however, there lie 
enviable charms, which liave caused his 
C'alic acquaintances to speak of him as 
that ''sweet Mr, Ehett." "Buzz" has 
made a brilliant record as the Command- 
ant's aide-de-camp, and has been a faith- 
ful servant. His oflicial name at the 
staff-mess is "Growley-Tub." "Good jjra- 
cious, Rhett. haven't you finished yet?" 



Julius Gbay Richardson 
New Orleans, La. 

Kichie, Rich, Gotch 

liy the irork we know the workman. 

Matriculated 1905: Private Company 
"A" ( 4 ) ; Corporal Company "C" ( .3 ) ; 
Sergeant Company "C" (2) ; Committee- 
man Final Ball (2) ; Lieutenant Com- 
panv "A" ( 1 ) ; Gvmnasium Team ( 3 ) , 
(2)", (1); Class Football Team (2), (1): 
Marshal Final Ball ; Marshal Final Ger- 
man ; Hop Committee ( 1 ) ; Editor-in- 
Chief of the Bomb. 

Xow, girls, fasten your loving gaze on 
this creature, and you will see the only 
man who ever studied all night and flunked 
class the next day. He is one of Tommy's 
bunch of scouts, and can frequently be 
heird to say, with a wistful expression on 
his countenance, "Why didn't I take Elec- 
tricity ?" But, ladies, he is wicked. What 
do you think he did ? Once, having care- 
fully locked his door, and crawled under 
his bed, he actually smoked a cigarette. 
Think of it! You wouldn't think it. but 
with all this, even, he is one of the most 
popular men in good old '09. 




Thomas Morton Scott 
JIcKinney, Texas 

Tom, Martie, Hcottie 

Where he succeeds, the merit's all his 
oion. 

Matriculated 1905; President of Class 
(3), (2). (1); Corporal Compiny "D" 
(3) ; Sergeant Company "C," (2) ;" Lieu- 
tenant Company "C" (1); Baseball (4). 
(3), (2), (1) : Football. (4), (1) ; Mar- 
shal Final Ball; Marshal Final German; 
Hop Committee; Business Manager Bomb; 
Business Manager Cadet; President Dia- 
lectic Society; Valedictorian. 

"Tom" hails from the metropolis of 
Collins County. Taken from a young 
lady's arms, and placed under "Madam's" 
rigid discipline, has turned out with many 
and varied accomplishments. Probably 
knows more "Calie" than any ten men at 
the Institute — ^liis correspondence being 
carried as second-class mail matter. Takes 
an unusual amount of interest in the 
Literary Society, and was once accused of 
being the "Master of the Spnnish Lan- 
g-uage." Very quiet and nindcsl. except on 
rsire occasions. 



.Tes.se L. Sinclair 
Hampton, Va. 

Jesse, Flicker-Flick, Flicker 
A still tongue makes a loise head. 

Matriculated 1905; Private Company 
"A"; Marshal Final Ball; Marshal Fina'l 
German; Member "Code of Honor;" Scrub 
Football Team; Class Football (2). 

This young man is the last representa- 
tive we have had of that well-known 
family of flickers. When first seen in 
barracks was immediately hailed and 
branded as such. "Flick" has great army 
ambitions, and often "attempts" ( ?) to 
(■x|ihiiii how he will run things in the 
.\niiy. but il is the impression of the 
writer that for years to come his post of 
duly will be assistant to "Ducky" in the 
inslvui'tioiis to "rats." In recent years he 
lias niaile great ]]ro,i;ress with the fair sex. 
and iiften in his sleep lias fallen into th 
habit (if giving himself away. 



' V 



.'F*- 



Cat, Smitty, Kitty 

"Wisdom is often hidden beneath the cloak 
of silence." 

Matriculated 1004; Private Company 
"D" (4) ; Corporal Company "B" (3)'; 
Private Company "A" (2), (1); Marshal 
Final German; President of the "V. M. I. 
Smith Club" of twenty-five members. 

This member of the "small" tribe of 
Smiths was smuggled into V. M. I. in tlie 
Fall of 1904. He claims that the greatest 
feat of mankind, that of Wheeling, W. 
Va., on the Ohio," originated in his active 
brain. In 1905 "Smitty" was one of the 
unlucky tliirteen" who found V. M. I. grub 
such that they deemed it best to go back 
home. However, the love of V. M. I. had 
formed too strong a hold, and "the cat 
came back." "Kitty" bids fair to become 
one of America's leading engineers. Here's 
to his success! CJirls, he is a fair mark; 
try him. 




KiciiAiiu F. Wagxeh 
Xewport Xews, Va. 

lUrr. Fritz, DeviVs Horse 
Seek and ye shall find. 
Matriculated Fall 1906; Private Com- 
pany "A" (3); Sergeant Company "C" 
(2): Qnarterniaster (1); ilarshal' Final 
Ball; JJarshal Final German; Mandolin 
Club (3), (2), (1) ; Cadet Staff. 

Mein Herr lias elevated ambitions of 
'•some day in tbe far future" beoominji a 
"gineral" in t'.ie Army, but we fear that 
he will in the end turn out a busUy crop 
of wool, Jako up his fiddle, and become 
second Mozart. His favorite song is 
"That's Gratitude." Is very fond of 
"Buzz" and the "Growiey" question. Once 
tried to ride a hor.se' across Natural 
Bridge, but when last seen was crossing a 
Lexington ehurcliyard fence. "Fritz" has 
the peculiar propensity of falling a victim 
to the bewitcliing smile of a different Calic 
at everj- hop. 



Caknall 
Sallisai 



WlIEELKR 

•, Okla. 



Fir/htiiifj Joe, Joshua, iScjiiuw /a 

For his hands refuse to labor. /m 

^Matriculated 1006: Private Company /^ 

"A"; Sergeant Company "B" ; Private 
Company "A." 

This aboriginal, who seems to be a di- 
rect descendant from Rip Van Winkle, 
spent a year or so at a school in ilissouri. 
and then hit the trail for V. M. I. He i 
landed here wearing a bandanna around (, 
his neck, and a hat four feet wide on his l! 
head, and immediately got busy in the I 
race for first stand. The thing that gives f 
him mo.st pleasure is to hear the "rats" 1 
give the war-whoop, and see them do the 
green-corn dance — it makes him feel so 
much at liome. He has a standing en- 
gagement to ride the "Gim" for Butts' 
Manual so as to keep in piactice for 
broncho busting. 




Ex-Classmates 



ADAMS, H. Lynchburg, Va. 

ALEXANDER, J. P Lexington, Va. 

ARCHIBALD, J. Q Carrollton. Mo. 

ARMSTRONG, ANTHONY G Alexandria. Va. 

ARMSTRONG, ALLEN G ' Norfolk. Va. 

BARNES, A. E Snow Hill, Md. 

BORDEN, F. K Goldsboro, N. C. 

BOYLAN, R. G Raleigh, N. C. 

*BOYLAN. W. J Raleigh, N. C. 

BROWN, A. G Berney. Montana 

BRUNS, L Howardsville. Va. 

CANN, W. G Savannah, Ga. 

CASON, L. H Carrollton, Mo. 

CASON, W. E Carrollton, JIo. 

CHEW. L. C Washington. D. C. 

CHRISTL\N, T. J Atlanta, Ga. 

CLARK, E. L Marlin. Texas 

CONVERSE, A.J Cohinibus. Ohio 

^Deceased. 

64 



COSBY, J. H Melton, N. C 

CRENSHAW, A. F Richmond, Va. 

CHRESMOND, J Fredericksburg, Va. 

CRITTENDEN, J. Kansas City, Mo. 

DANIELS, G. S. Savannah, Ga. 

DUNCAN, E. T Grenada, Miss. 

EBEL, H. V Richmond, Va. 

EDMUNDS, C. R Baltimore, Md. 

ELLIOTT, K •' Gadsden, Ala. 

EWELL, J. H Goliad, Texas 

FAISON, W. A Goldsboro, N. C. 

FALLIGANT, L. A Savannah, Ga. 

FLOYD, B Spartanburg, S. C. 

GARBER, D. M Brooklyn, N. Y. 

GARRARD, W Savannah, Ga. 

GREER, R. D Peoria, 111. 

GUTHRIE, W. H Nashville, Tenn. 

HAGER, R. B Ashland, Ky. 

HALL, H. L Sherman, Texas 

HAMLIN, T ■ Danville, Va. 

HARDWICKE, R. E Sherman, Texas 

HARMAN, W. J Pulaski, Va. 

HAWES, L. B Towanda, Penn. 

HENDERSON, J. W Germantown, Md. 

HOLT, C.J West Point, Va. 

HOWARD, T. H Floyd Court House, Va. 

HUNDLEY, G. L.. Danville, Va. 

JERMAN, W. B Raleigh, N. C. 

JONES, B. M Richmond, Va. 

JONES, W. C. . Norfolk, Va. 

KANE, H. S Gate City, Va. 

KING, O. D Albemarle, N. C. 

LADD, A. K Sherman, Taxas 

LAUGHON, F. J Pulaski, Va. 

LLOYD, A. E Durham. N. C. 

LOGAN, D Bowling Green, Ky. 

LOWRY, R. A Catlettsburg, Ky. 

McDERMOTT, H Tellico Plains, Tenn. 

McCOY, W. S Independence, ilo. 

McMillan, D. N Chattanooga, Tenn. 

McCALL, P. A Savannah, Ga. 

Maclean, G. M Savannah, Ga. 

MAHONE, M. T Petersburg. Va. 

ilARTIN, J. G Portsmouth, Va. 

MAY, H. D Charleston, W. Va. 

MILLER, 0. N Richmond, Va. 

MUECHISON, J. R Wilmington, N. C. 



65 



NEWSOME, T. W McKenney, Texas 

NOBLE, S. N Tallapoosa. Ga. 

NOELL, J. C Danville, Va. 

NORRIS, E. J Louisville, Va. 

PARRISH, R. E Baltimore, Md. 

PEEPLES, R. G Savannah, Ga. 

PENDLETON, A. M New York, N. Y. 

PENN, W. J Reidsville, N. C. 

PEYTON, W. M Salem, Va. 

POLLOCK, J Wheeling, W. Va. 

PORTNEE, H Manassas, Va. 

PRESTON, F. B Amsterdam, Va. 

PRETTYMAX. T. M Marion, S. C. 

QUINN, 0. B McComb City, Miss. 

READ, O. M Yemassee, S. C. 

REILLY, N. H Huntington, W. Va. 

ROBERTSON, G. T Me.xico. Mo. 

SAUNDERS, J. W Jackson. Miss. 

SEARLES. H ' Vicksburg, Miss. 

SHARPER. W. F Westminster, Md. 

SHORT, T. DuB Ft. Riley, Kansas 

SIMS, N. P Bowling Green. Ky. 

SMITH, H. F Houston, Texas 

SMITH, H. R Fayetteaville, N. C. 

SMITH, R. H Aberdeen, Md. 

STARK, J. C Morelia, Mexico 

STEVENS, C. W Richmond, Va. 

SUMMERS, G. C Mooresbury, Tenn. 

SUTTON, D. B Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

TATUM. R San Francisco, Cal. 

THRAVES, 0. R Belona. Va. 

WALKER, W. H Helton, Texas 

WATSON, M. R New Orleans, La. 

WESTMORELAND, Atlanta, Ga. 

WIEST, P. R York, Penn. 

WILLIAMS, J. B Fort Smith, Ark. 



History of the Class of 1909 



F(ir fiiuv long years wc have plodded along through our classes and through 

drills, finding fault with everything and satisfied with nothing; but old Father 

Time has come around with 1909 at last, 
and our "dips" are in sight. It is hard to 
realize that the rats who landed here in the 
Fall of 1905 are now first classmen. 

We are now in our last year at the old 
Institute, and things that seemed so hard 
when we were going through with them don't 
look the same. It's funny that the very 
things a man kicks about most while he is 
doing them are the things he is proudest of 
afterward. We can look back now on our 
]iast cadet life with a lot of satisfaction. In 
fact, it almost seems as if we have been 
cadets always. It has become second nature 
t(.) get u]t and go to bed to the tune of a 
l)Uglc ; and it has been so long since we 
could do as we jjleased that it is doubtful if 
we will be able to navigate our own canoe 
No doubt we will have an insane desire to 

be back here — others have claimed they felt that way; but just now it is hard 

to believe them. 

Friendships have been formed that will last the remainder of our lives, 

and in future years the fond reniendirance of these will place the old Institute 




A FlKST Clas.sman's Chuistsias 

when the Institute turns us out. 




in a very different light. We will like it because of its associations and the 
familiar and hajapy faces it brings back to memory. The iinpleasant things 
will have been forgotten, and we will remember the things that made cadet 
life enjoyable. When we think of V. M. I., some pleasant memory will be 
called to mind, snch as being chased do^vn an alley up town by a sub, and 
jn-obably caught; but the penalty for it will be forgotten and only the bright 
side will be seen. 




FlEEWOEKS AND THE RESULT 

The path from rats to first classmen has not been smooth always — it has 
been up hill and down. It used to be a matter upon which we could congratu- 
late ourselves if we could leave our rooms and get back again withoiit being 
flagged when we were rats ; and, certainly, no bunch of rats ever had more 
attention of a particular kind from a third class than we did. But that is all 
gone now, and from our present point of view it doesn't seem that it was so 
very bad. 

What we bad to go through with then was probably the cause of luir 
downfall as third classmen. We came back here with the idea that we were 



it. We proceeded to show the uew rats that our tails had dropped and we were 
no longer subject to hnniiliation of having to "fin out." There are many ways 
of doing this, and we tried them all. The rats came in for their share of the 
sport ; bombs were fired whenever an opportunity afforded itself, and to make 




I I 



Topo(;i!APHV Squad 

the class long remembered the class numerals were painted in every av 
place. The whole thing was wound up by a grand display of fireworks 
of the Academic Building. We can see now, as well as anybody, how 
it all was — twenty penalty tours and six months' 
confinement is calculated to make a cadet see 
things in the right light — but then it seemed the 
only thing to do. 

As second classmen we were as peaceable and 
quiet a lot as you would want to see. We had 
been "Old Cadets" long enough not to have to 
tear dnwn the barracks to let the rats know it. 
The year was one of complete rest froin all such 
mental and physical strains. Our time was spent 
in studying and ac(|uiriiig the dignity that our 
coming first class year required. 

We are now reaping the benefits of three years 
well s])ent. For being good those three years we 
are allowed to go up town every Saturday and 
Sunday night from supi:)er roll call until tattoo. 
It certainly pays a fellow to stay here until he is 
The CRihj5o«j IT/ineLER '^ ^^'^^ classman, so he can enjoy these privileges. ■ q^q 



ailable 
on top 
foolish 





t-lftCK 




When We Were Second I'lassmkn 

Another first class jjrivilege is to have a banquet. We had i:)urs on the 31st day 
of December, 1908, and it will be I'emenibered by every member of the class 
as long- as he remembers V. M. T. It is about the greatest thing '09 has pulled 
iitf, and is second only to the Iniilding of the Pyramids. 

In the way of athletics '09 has been far above the average class. Ever 
since we have been here members of the class have been couspienoTis in all of 
its branches, and the football, baseball, and gynmasium teams have drawn 
from its numbers extensively. 

We are not ashamed of any part of our record, and it is to be hoped that 
V. M. I. will never have cause to be ashamed of any of us. We leave her with 
the intention of being as loyal as alumni as we have been as cadets ; so look 
out for a reunion of the class in a few years. 

IIlST01£IA.\, 1909. 










l»''WCeROFt;(AMS- 



Z'^wcmorcXAMS- 



3'"WeCK Of EXATIS- 




'09 CLASS RING 



RING, ALSO THE 1908 AND 1910 CLASS RINGS 

WERE SPECIALLY DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED ST 

J. F. NEWMAN, 1 1 JOHN STREET, New York 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 



The 1909 Class Banquet 



Qgenu 



Lyniiluiven Bays 

eleiy Salted Ahiionds Olives 

Radishes 

Fried Frog T.egs Tartar SaiK-e 

Saratoga Chips 

Roast Rliode Island Turkey 

Cranberry Sauce 

Candied Sweet Pota.toes 

Broiled I'liiladelphia Squnh mi Toast 

French Peas 

Chicken Salad Mayonnaise 

Beaten Biscuits 

Nesselrode Pudding Assorted Cake 

Camembert Cheese Crackers 

Coffee Cigars 



Coasts 

TOASTir ASTER SCOTT 

"Now all together." 

Past and Present of '0!) Alexander 

"Past and to come seems good, things present best." 

Officers Hayes 

"Rank has its bores as well as its pleasures." 

Privates Owsley 

"The soldier's blood exalts the captain." 

"Dips" Polk 

"^York produces virtue, and virtue honor." 

Athletics ilAGRUDER 

"A scar nobly got is a good livery of honor." 

"Caocs" Richardson 

"A pretty woman is a welcome guest." 

Ex-Classmates Barnes 

"Work ill done must be done twice." 

V- il- I .Jenkins 

"Giood things should be praised." 

Future of '09 Crockett 

"It is impossible to tell what is in the f\iture." 
Impromptu Toasts — 

"Good Night, Ladies." 

71 



Class of 1910 



COLORS: Maroon and Silver (iraj 

B. F. CROWSON President 

H G POAGUE Vice-President 

T. S. PATTISON Historian 

MEMBERS 

ADAMS, HAYS Lynchburg, Va. 

AKIN. SPENCER B Greenville, Miss. 

ANDERSON, .JAMES A., JR Lynchburg, Va. 

BALDINGER, ORA M Norfolk, Va. 

BALL, EDWARD C ■ May.sville, Ky. 

BENTLEY, J. BRUCE Hampton, Va. 

BLOW, ALLMAN M Ware Neck, Va. 

BOWE, WILLIAM F Augusta, Ga. 

BROWN, CHARLES C St. Louis, Mo. 

CAFFERY, JAMES P La Fayette, La. 

COULBOURN, CHARLES B Walker's Ford, Va. 

CROWSON, BEN F Parksley, Va. 

DASHIELL. HARRY G Smithfield, Va. 

DENHAil. .JAJIES L Washington, D. C. 

DODSON, H. LEE St. Michaels. Md. 

EASTHAM, KENNA G. . . Harrisonburg, Va. 

ELLISON, ALEXANDER H Norfolk, Va. 

ENGLISH, PAUL X Richmond, Va. 

GILLIAM, .JAMES R Lynchburg. Va. 

HAMNER, G. CARROLL Washington, D. C. 

HODGE. EDWIN. .IR Henderson, Ky. 

HULL, CARL T ^"^w York, N. Y. 

JOHNSON, FRANCIS L Crescent, W. Va. 

KANE, HENRY S Gate City, Va. 

MACKALL, PORTER A Savannah, Ga. 

MACLEAN. GEORGE M Savannah, Ga. 

MAHONE. MARION T Petersburg, Va. 

MURPHY, D. EDWARD Washington, D. C. 

NICHOLS. .JAMES A., JR ■■ ■ Petersburg, Va. 

NOWLIN, ROBERT A Lynchburg, Va. 

ORR, ROBERT S Pennington Gap, Va. 

PATTISON, THEO. S., .JR Cambridge, Md. 

PAYNE, J. GORDON, JR Lynchburg, Va. 

POAGUE, HENRY G Lexington, Va. 

RANKIN, GEORGE I Goshen, N. Y. 

73 



RHETT, R. BARNWELL Summerville. S. C. 

RICHARDS, J. RUSSELL Riverton. Va. 

ROBERTSON, GEORGE T Mexico, ilo. 

SAUNDERS, RICHARD B Richmond, Va. 

SNIDOW, ROBERT C Pembroke, Va. 

STAPLES, S. HEREFORD \\ylie. Tex. 

TALIAFERRO, JOHN C Baltimore, Md. 

TAYLOR, ALBERT L Pittsburg, Pa. 

'I'HOMPSON. JOHN V Lynch'.s, Va. 

TINSLEY. JAJIES W.. JR East Radford, Va. 

WARD, BERKELEY, JR Pajonian Springs, Va. 

WESTMORELAND, WILLIS F Atlanta, Ga. 

WHITE, GILBERT G Abingdon, Va. 

WILSON. G. SCOTT Belton. Mo. 

YANCEY, JAMES P. . . Culpeper, Va. 



History of the Class of 1910 




It was on the eleventh of September, l!)0(i, that the usual crowd of young 
men in and around barracks screamed forth to all beholders by their stiff 

jwstures and frightened counte- 
nances, that a new ''rat" class had 
laid siege to V. M. I. On that 
day was gathered together for the 
first time the Class of J.910, a 
nondescript crowd composed of 
representatives from every state in 
the Tnion, come to the Institute 
for the single pur];)ose of becoming 
soldiers. Some wore civilian 
clothes, some had already been 
issued uniforms, all wore the blue 
cap which we already regarded as 
the badge of servitude ; we must 
have seemed a motley crew. Un- 
like every other class, we reported 
at the same time that the old cadets were ordered back, and something in our 
ap]iearance seemed to inspire in them a repugnance which manifested itself 
in treatment which we thought severe, not to say brutal. 

Those first few months of our 
cadet life contained untold horrors 
for us, and few of us will forget 
some of oTir experiences. Let us 
draw the curtain of charity over 
those harrowing times. Suffice it 
to say that we ever dreaded the 
sound of the oncoming third class- 
man, and learned far too much 
i)f the broom and bayonet along 
with the knowledge of the soldier's 
life which we absorbed. 

Drearily as the days of our rat 
year wore on, time really did 
move, and finally, after passing 
through the rigors of a week's 




KlCIlIE OrFICIATI> 




AN Old Cadet 



eucampment at the Jamestown Exposition, and enduring stoically the enjoy- 
ments of Final Week, we were released from our "rathood" by the sweet notes 

of "Auld Lang Syne." The 
transition from the lowly estate 
of "rats" to the proud position of 
"old cadets" was accompanied by 
more enjoyment than most of us 
will live to again partake of. 
Pride of corp.'s chevrons and 
chagrin at the lack thereof were 
swept away in a tide of gladness 
^ ^^H r ~*ljt,y ^V 1^1 i ^-"■"'l^^^ ^^^^' oui' rat year was past. 

^'f~'-"^^H» ^Wr A 1 1*^ %K^^^^ ^^' ^^^ conclusion of our first 

furlough we again assembled at 
the Institute, a group of young 
men whose apf)earance differed 
much from that presented but a 
short year before. In spite of a 
number of al)rtentof's, among them some of our best men, and in spite of our 
sadness at so soon leaving the delii^hts of home, we were genuinely glad to be 

together, no more as rats, but as 
third classmen. Forthwith we 
turned our attention to our 
successors in ratdom ; our treat- 
ment of them was in every way 
up to the standard set by other 
classes. 

Our Third Class spring seemed 
to drag even more slowly than its 
predecessor. In a creditable 
manner we sirrvived the vicissi- 
tudes inevitable in the Third 
Class ; our escutcheon unblotted 
and our record full of incidents 
ever recalled with a thrill of 
pride. But we hailed with joy 
the coming of finals, with its promise of the added dignity and widened 
inrtuence characteristic of the Second Class. 




On the Ice 



76 



The Session of 1908-1909 has been for us a very pleasant one, albeit our 
number is still further lessened, and some of us have suffered our usual 

penalties for misdemeanors, in 
every jahase of college activity 
our interest, always intense, has 
been greatly increased. In 
athletics we have a large repre- 
sentation on all the teams, and 
l^rospects for good records in 
every sport are bright for next 
>'ear, when the Institute's prowess 
will be more completely under 
"ur control. Our participation 
in other fields has been equally 
marked. 

So we stand on the threshold 
of the time which means so much 
to every V. M. I. man, our first 
class year. Of our original one 




PooE Skat IN 




The LevjNtToM FoLice roRce. 
( Actual 5iic) 





liimdred and twenty men scarcely 
a third are left, a compact baud 
united in their desire to work 
their hardest for 1910. Such a 
spirit wo hring to the labors 
which will be ours as the aj-'bitei-s, 
for the time, of the Institute's 
destinies. Our hearts are set on 
l)ut one thing, — to make such a 
record for V. :\I. I. that the Cla^s 
of 1!)1() will be ever rememliered 
as the class which launched mir 
beloved Alma Mater on a course 
toward a prosperity the like df 
which she has never kmiwn. 

HlSTOEIAX, 1010. 





CRAXY ED 




Signal Coieps and Drill 



Class of 1911 



Colors: Oran.m' and ISUie 

L. T. GEROW Pkesident 

W. C. JACKSON Vice-President 

E. T. DAVANT Historian 

MEMBERS 

ADAMS, WALKER H Lvnchburg, Va. 

BARKSDALE, ALFRED D Houston, Va. 

BEAUCHAMP, JAMES R Princess Anne, Md. 

BECKER, LELAND Roanoke, Va. 

BIEDLER. PAUL McA Baltimore, Md. 

BILLUPS. FORD L Truitt. Tex. 

BLACKilORE, PHILIP Hampton. Va. 

BOOTH, C. MURRAY Oak Park. 111. 

BRISTER, CHARLES M Petersburg, Va. 

BROWN, MILLS La Grange"'- Tex. 

BUESCHER, ALFRED G. Smithville, Tex. 

BURDEAU. GEORGE T St. Louis, Mo. 

BURLESON. MURRAY F Smithville, Tex. 

CAJSIP, VAUGHAN Franklin, Va. 

CANNON, WILLIAM R North Hanover. Mass. 

CLARK, HARVEY R Schiilenburg, Tex. 

CLEmiER, RICHARD H Middlebrook, Va. 

COLE. ENSER W Carnegie, Pa. 

COLLIER, THOMAS H., JR Altheimer, Kan. 

COLLINS, GEORGE R Charleston, W. Va. 

DAVANT. C. RINGGOLD Roanoke, Va. 

DAVANT, EDWARD T Roanoke.' Va. 

DAVISON, YANCEY McA Baltimore, Md. 

DILLARD, A. WOOD New York, N. Y. 

DONALDSON. LYTER J Carrollton, Mo. 

DUFFY, FRANK L Cynthiana, Ky. 

EARLY, J, FINKS Wilhoit, Va. 

EASTHAM, ROBERT L Harrisonburg. Va. 

ELY, PRICE W .Jonesville, Va. 

EMERY, NATHANIEL W Danville, Va. 

EWING, JAMES L New Orleans'. La. 

FAY, THOMAS H Cleveland, 0. 

FENNO, SYLVAN A Washington, D. C 

ERASER. DOUGLAS M San Antonio. Tex. 

GARDNER, JAMES Augusta, Ga. 

GENTRY, WALTER R Independence,' Mo. 

81 



GEROW, LEONARD T Petersburg, Va. 

GOSSETT, RALPH Williamston. S. C. 

GUTHRIE, M. MERRITT NashyjUg^ jenn, 

HAGAN, J. MORTON Eiehraond, Va. 

HAGENBUCH, JOSEPH S Mahanoy City, Pa. 

HANCOCK, CAMDEN F Lynchburg. Va. 

HIRST, VIRGINIUS B Purcellville. Va. 

HOLTON, W. LAYTON Centrevill?. Md. 

HOPKINS, R. THOMPSON Nashville. Tenn. 

HOWARD, SAMUEL L Wasliiii;^ton. D. C. 

HUNDLEY, JOSEPH M ; . . Lebanon. Ky. 

JACKSON, WILLIAM C Richmond, Va. 

JOHNSON, A. BR0ADDU8 Houston. Va. 

JOHNSON, T. KIRK Norfolk, Va. 

JOHNSTON, F. BERTRAND Bessemer, Mich. 

JOHNSTON, NEWMAN Baltimore, Md. 

JONES, JOHN W D?catur, Ala. 

JORDAN, J. JULIAN Hinton. W. Va. 

KANE, PATRICK L Gate City. Va. 

KEITH, A. A. MORTON Richmond. Va. 

KELLEY, HOMER C New Lexington. O 

KINSOLAaNG, HERBERT B Mt. Sterling. Ky. 

KRAFT, WILLIAM R Kingston. N. Y. 

LANIER, RAYMOND S Danville. Ky. 

LEE, H. FITZHUGH I^redericksburg. Va. 

LONG, MATT R Rnxboro. N. C 

MoENTEE, JAMES A Kin-;ston. N. Y. 

McAATlORTER, KINGSLEY Romoko. Va. 

MECREDY, JAMES R Roanoke, Va. 

MILLER, RANDOLPH D Roanoke, Va. 

MILLNER, SAMUEL M., JR Danville. V'. 

MISH, ROBERT W. H Middlebrook. Va. 

MOORE, L. FRANKLIN Gad.sden, Ala. 

MORRISON, LAWRENCE F Kansas City. Mo. 

NALLE, ADRIAN Culpeper. Va. 

NOBLE, STEPHEN N Cedartown. Ga. 

OWEN, ARCHER A., JR Turbeville. Va. 

PARKER, WILLIAM Chance. Va. 

POLLARD, VALENTINE H Newberne. All. 

PORTER, JOHN S Binnin'/iinni. Al.. 

POWELL, JOHN H Smitliville. Tex. 

POWELL, MATHEW J Belmont. Va. 

REMBERT, GAILLARD Rembert, S. C. 

RICHARDSON, EDMUND E., JR New Orleans. La. 

ROBINSON, WARREN S Norfolk. Vi. 

RUEHRMUND, MAX E , Richmond, Va. 

SCHULTZ, PERCY J Fort Worth. Tex. 

SCHWARZENBERG, COLEMAN Cleveland, O. 

SMITH, HAROLD W Purcellville. Va 

82 



SMITH, JULIAN Biniiiiigluun, Ala. 

SMITH, MACLIN F Birminghcam, Ala. 

STEVENS, GEORGE VV., JR Richmond, Va. 

STEVENSON, JOHN Corinth, Ky. 

TAYLOR, JOHN T Rocky Mount, Va. 

THOMAS, NEWELL E Taylor, Tex. 

THOMAS. RICE H Roanoke, Va. 

IRINKLE, LACY L Dublin. Va. 

VENABLE, HARRY M Charleston, W. Va. 

VOGEL, CABELL G Leavenworth, Kan. 

WALKER, H. DAVIS Pemberton, Va. 

WARNER, ROBERT H St. Louis, Mo. 

WHALEY. HARRY E .• Cluster Springs, Va. 

WHITE, ISAAC G Shawsville, Va. 

\'\'HITE, WILBUR S Bucyrus, 0. 

WHITFIELD, W. IRVIN Danville, Va. 

WILSON, J. PENDLETON Wheeling, W. Va. 

WILSON, ROGER M Savannah, Ga. 

WRIGHT, CHARLES W Alexandria, Va. 

YOUNG, W. LESLIE Lexington, Va. 

ZOLLMAN, CHARLES W \'\'alton. Iiid. 



History of the Class of 1911 




It's all very well for the people whose annals 
are few, but it's almighty hard on the historian 
who has a specified sj^ace to fill. There are rich 
pickings in a fertile field, but one man has to 
scratch pretty hard for sustenance in a desert. 
Therefore, when the historian looks back through 
the past year, he is at a loss for something 
definite to record. Of course, mention might 
be made of Goldie's lost bugle, or Piano's new 
method of loading the evening gun ; not forget- 
ting about Snake's exploded ideas. But all of 
these thing's are after all mere ticks of the 
Clock-of-Passing-Events, which will hardly out- 
live the time taken in telling them. 

A third classman's lot is not an en\'iable one. 
There are only two days in the whole year out of which he gets enjoyment : the 
day he becomes an old cadet, and the day he erases to be a third classman. 
TTere a third classman gets all the blame and all the jienalty for anything out 
of the ordiuary that happens. Of course, then, 
he tries to live up to the standard by which he 
is judged. 

AlthdUgh this class is the life of the school, 
e\'ei'V()ne tries to ])nt us down, not because they 
don't want the school life to be animated, but 
because — well, I suppose they hate to see those 
whom they consider little uuu-e than rats get 
ahead of them. They laugh at the amusements 
alTorded by the third class, then bone any 
member of that class they can find. The u]i])er 
classes deny the third class the right to call 
itself the backbone of the school; no one can 
deny that it is the backbone of the fourth class ; 
for proof see the erect carriage of the "rats." 

Before ano After the Third Deguee ix "Stoxy's" Office 
84 





In scratcliing the exterior of the vacuum wherein his ideas generate, the 
historian came across one of those inex2Dlicable memoranda which brought to 
mind the athletic achievements of his classmates. Two members of his class are 
wearing football monograms, two others have likewise been rewarded for prowess 
in baseball, and in basket-ball the class is well represented. This is doing pretty 
well for a start. 

Before the sad event which closed the football season, '11 had high aspira- 
tions for the championship among the class foot- 
ball teams. One fatal day, the eighteenth of 
jSTovember, we met the First Class team on 
the gridiron. There wc manifested our wor- 
thiness for some future success, but all our 
previous cravings for distinction were crushed 
under the weight of the score lulled up against us. 
The runners of the Marathon races are not 
in it with the corps., every one of whom sees sev- 
eral pairs of sergeant's chevrons floating before 
bis eyes. There's many a corj)., biit few are 
chcisen to be sergeants. Thus it is that every 
man is doing his best to get to the goal of his 
amliitions before all the (>]usive tro]ihies of a 
successfully run race have disa])]ieared. 

As a rule, this class has tried tn let well 
enough alone; to be good as long as it was al- 
lowed to go its way in peace. It has afforded am- 
ple anuisenient for the two up]ier classes ; in 
fact, it has d(ine uKU-e than was tn be expected 
from it. As has been said before, the Third 
Class is tractable, as long as it is allowed tn 
carry on its affairs without interference ; but 
when its s])irits arc corked u]), it has proved it- 
self to be like a bottle of smelling salts : innoc- 
uous and ornamental on the outside, but full of 
a concentrated power for mischief should any 
one have the temerity to remove the stopjjer. I 
say this with no desire to boast ; it is a fact, and 
as such has a legitimate place in history. 

HlSTOEIAX, '11. 
85 






m 

liiil 



Class of 1912 



Colors: (Not yet selected) 

J. HASTIE President 

C. E. MOORE Vice-President 

E. S. BOYKIX Secretary 

T. v.. BEAZELTON Historian 

MEMBERS 

ADAMS, ARTHUE A., JE Birmingliam, Ala. 

ADAMS, CAREOLL C Lynchburg, Va. 

AMERINE, WARREN JI Montgomery, Ala. 

ANDERSON, MERIWETHER 1 Eichmond, Va. 

BAEKSDALE, JAMES A Savannah, Ga. 

BASKEEVILLE, GEOEGE T Boydton, Va. 

BEETON, FEANCIS E Lexington,' Va. 

BELL, GEOEGE \A' C'ambridgeport, Mass. 

BENNETT, TRACY D Washington, D. C. 

BISHOP, H. EOPEE St. Louis, Mo. 

BLANCHAED, PAUL S Columbus, Ga. 

BLOMQULST, CAEL W Port Gibson, Miss. 

BOUGHTON, GEOEGE XA' Washington, D. C. 

BOWMAN, EUFUS C Salem, Va. 

BOYCE, JOSEPH E., JE Pine Bluft', Ark. 

BOYKIN, R. STANLEY Wilson, N. C. 

BRAZELTON. T. BEERY Waco, Tex. 

BRANDT, JACKSON, JR Baltimore', Md. 

BROOKS, E. EMEEY, JE Houston, Tex. 

BEOWN, ALANSON \\- St. Louis, Mo. 

EEOWN, FOSTEE V., .JE Chattanooga, Tenn. 

BEYAN, HENRY T., JE Tarboro, N. C. 

BUETON, EEUBEN, JE Eichmond, Va. 

CAMPBELL, GEOEGE B Bedford City. Va. 

CAREINGTON, TAZEWELL M., JE Eichmond, Va. 

CARSON, ROBERT T Colgate, Okla. 

CARTER, FRANK W Warrenton, Va. 

CARTER, S. FAIN, JR Houston, Tex. 

CHAPMAN, EEUBEN C HuntsviUe, Ala. 

CHILDS, J. RIVES Lynchburg, Va. 

CHEISTIAN, A. HELLAM Lynchburg, Va. 

COLDWELL, COLBEET El Paso, Tex. 

CUMMINGS, E. PAUL Eeidsville, N. C. 

CUNNINGHAM, DON K Beaumont, Tex. 

DALTON, JOSEPH N Winston-Salem, N. C. 

DAVENPOET, EALPH M Denver, Col. 

87 



DEXXY, WALTER E Xewellton, La. 

DEY, WILLIAM T Norfolk, Va. 

DILLARD, WILLIAM E Li,Tiehburg, Va. 

DODD, KAXDELL S St. Louis, Mo. 

DREXXEX, DOXALD Xew York, N. Y'. 

EDWARDS, W. HOWARD Leesburg, Va.' 

ERCK, CARL B Plattsbmg Barracks, X. Y. 

ERSKINE, WALLACE A Baltimore, Md. 

EWIXU, JOHN D Xew Orleans, La. 

FARRELL, DANDRIDGE St. Louis, Mo. 

FEREBEE, G. COOK Norfolk, Va. 

FICiGINS, BERNARD W Arlington, Va. 

GANXAWAY, WALTER C Lynchburg, Va. 

GANT, EDWIN H Burlington, N. C. 

GELZER, EDWARD DrPONT Richmond, Va. 

GERSON, GUSTAVE R Houston, Tex. 

GIBSON, WILLIAM L Washington, D. C. 

GOEPEL. FRANK L Port Gibson, Miss. 

GREGORY, WILLIAM K Louisville, Ky. 

GROVE. ARTHUR A Luray, Va. 

(JROVE, FRAKK A., JR Max Meadows, Va. 

HARRILL, WILLIAM K Knoxville, Tenn. 

HARRIS, HERBERT W New Kent, Va. 

HARRISON, J. STUART Matanzas, Cuba. 

HASTIE, JACK, JH Seattle, Wash. 

HAYS, LEONARD Barnesville, Md. 

HENDERSON, EUGENE, JR Fort Smith, Ark. 

HIGGINBOTHAjM, JOHN L Dublin, Tex. 

HILTON, CORSON L Sylvania, Ga. 

HOAIES, PETER P Boydton, \'a. 

HORDERN, HERBERT R Warrenton, Va. 

HULL, WASHINGTON, JR New York, N. Y. 

HUTCHINSON, FRANK E Fairmont, W. Va. 

HUTTER, J. LOGWOOD ■ Lynchburg, Va. 

INGRAM, NELSON Richmond, Va. 

JACKSON, H. STANLEY Drakes Branch, Va. 

JOYNER, CHARLES G Baltimore, Md. 

JULIAN, LEE S Liike City, Fla. 

KEITH, LUCIAN J Warrenton, Va. 

KOLL, WALTER A Los Angeles, Cal. 

LEE, SIDNEY W., JR Birmingham, Ala. 

LEW-IS, ROBERT W New Y'ork, N. Y. 

LLOYD, EDWARD, JE, Washington, D. C. 

LLOYD, EGBERT T Washington, D. C. 

LONG, RAYMOND M Medina, O. 

McCART, LAWRENCE K Fort Worth, Tex. 

ilcCALLISTER, C:LINE W Hurricane, W. Va. 

McCULLOUGH, HILLIS K Houston, Tex. 

JIcCLELLAN. R. PRIXCE Corsicana, Tex. 



McCLURE, HUGH • Staunton, Va. 

yicELROY, G. WHITFIELD Lebanon, Ky. 

McGEE, CHARLES H Leland, Miss. 

McGEE, RALPH W Leland, Miss. 

McRAE, DONALD M Wasliington, D. C. 

MALSBERGER, A. HUEY, JR Massey, Md. 

MARTIN, DONALD M Kingston, N. Y. 

MARTIN, MARLIN C Little Rock, Ark. 

MAYER, EUGENE N Norfolk, Va. 

MERIAN, PHILIP A Rye, N. Y. 

MILLER, ALBERT C Columbus, Ga. 

MINTON, JOHN T Fort Leaven\\orth, Kan. 

MOORE. CHARLES E Berryville, Va. 

MORRISON, CASSELL S Kansas City, Mo. 

MORRISSETT, D. GORDON Lynchburg, Va. 

JIOSBY", T. TALFOURD Lynchburg, Va. 

MOSELEY, THOMAS S Richmond, Va. 

NABORS, CLARENCE D Dallas, Tex. 

NASH, LLOYD N San Antonio. Tex. 

O'BRIEN, ROBERT L Dublin, Tex. 

PEARSON, THOMAS .J.. .IR Pearisburg, Va. 

PURDIE, KENNETH S Norfolk, Va. 

RHETT, RICHARD C Summerville, S. C. 

ROBINSON, CUSTER Richmond, Va. 

ROCKWELL, KIFFIN Y Asheville, N. C. 

RODMAN, JOHN W., JR Frankfort, Ky. 

SAjSIS, R. TROY' Bristol, Tenn. 

SAXON, J. LANDRUM Augusta, Ga. 

SCHILLING, STEPHEN J Port Gibson, Miss. 

SEIBOLD, MARTIN H New York, N. Y. 

SETTER, JOSEPH L Cattaraugus, N. Y. 

SEVIER, LANDERS, JR Portsmouth, Va. 

SHOTWELL, RANDOLPH K Culpeper, Va. 

SHUFELDT, FRANK A., JR Napoleonville, La. 

SIMPSON, JOHN R.. JR Fort Gaines, Ga. 

SMITH, ALAN M Binningham, Ala. 

SMITH, BREEDLOVE Colorado City, Tex. 

SMITH, ESTILL V Fort Leavenworth, Kan. 

SMITH, GEORGE A Baltimore, Md. 

SMITH, MYRON A Colorado City, Tex. 

SMITH, ROY B., JR Roanoke, Va. 

SMITH, THOMAS Philadelphia. Pa. 

SMITH, TOM 0., JR Birmingham, Ala. 

SMITH, W. ALFRED Birminglu^m, Ala. 

SPEER, GEORGE A., JR Atlanta, Ga. 

STOCKS, G. BENJAMIN Blue Rapids, Kan. 

STUCKY, HAERY C Lexington, Ky. 

SYDNOR, WILLIAM 0., JR Staunton, Va. 

TAYLOR, GEORGE DeB Norfolk, Va. 

89 



TAYLOR, SWEDEN S Jackson, Miss. 

TEMPLETON, HAMILTON Malolas Buliean, P. I. 

THOM, WILLIAM A., JR Norfolk, Va. 

THOMPSON, ROBERT M Corsieana, Texas 

THROCKMORTON, ROBERT J Richmond, Va. 

VOSS, CARL L Pittsburg. Pa. 

WALTON, JOSEPH S Roanoke. Va. 

WEAR, WILLIAM D Hillsboro, Texas 

WELSH, W. CARROLL Purcellville, Va. 

WESCOTT, NATHANIEL S Mappsburg, Va. 

WEST, R. ASHTON Bellevue, Va. 

WILSON, LEROY C Baltimore, Md. 

WILSON, W. LEE ' Dallas, Texas 

WITT, THOMAS F Richmond, Va. 

WOOLARD, SOLOMON Tarboro, N. C. 

WRIGHT, THOMAS D Durham', N. C. 

YEATMAN, PHILIP W Norfolk Va. 



History of the Class of 1912 




Any one who has ever been to V. M. I. will remember the day on which 
he first reported and became a fnll-fledged "rat." Our class reported on the 
second day of Se])tember, 1908. All of ns remember marching to the "Q. M.'s" 

to receive, as it were, our 
badge of servitude and rat- 
hood, in the shape of a 
military cap. When we 
got liack to our rooms we 
sat around, in fear and 
trembling', on such ar- 
ticles of furniture as were 
available ; and, let me add, 
a blacking stool, wardrobe 
and table were the only 
available ones. We had 
not been in our rooms long 
before some kind third 
classman came ujd to in- 
struct us in our duties and 
to teach us respect and rev- 
erence for the upper class- 
man. Our course of in- 
struction began with such questions as, "What's your name, Mister ?" "Where 
are you from?" "Who do you know there I know?" and innumerable other 
questions tending to reduce any swelling ()f the head we might have, and also 
to teach us our place. 

When first call for dinner sounded we were ])rctty well tired out, and dis- 
appointed in V. M. I. and "military life" in general. Luckily, we did not know 
the trials before us, or some of us might have been tempted to forego the pleas- 
ures that were in store for us. Going down to dinner formation we began 
"fining out" for the first time. At dinner we first learned, and to our sorrow, 
the meaning of "sounding off" on some up^jcr classman. Many tasks, such as 
asking the O. C. for a bucketful of countersigns, asking the "Beam" to give 
us "deck" on a corporal, and others of this nature, were imposed on us. 



Sxow Fight 



During the next few days life was one eternal grind and hard- 
shi]3. It seemed that the time for us to "crawl into our hay" would never 
come and that never again should we hear the sound of taps, the sweetest music 
of all to cadet ears. Here, at least, we were safe from all danger, except that 
of being "dumped." During the next week it was drill, drill, drill, and then 
some, and at the end of that time our veiw efficient drillmasters, with the 
aid of a bayonet and other articles of this nature, had taught us the rudiments 
of the art. 

From the opening of school until along in December the Third Class de- 
voted their energy to looking after our welfare, but at that time they had 
some trouble with the "Beam," and we were left to ourselves for a time. The 

Third Class needed us, how- 
ever, and we were told to 
have a "night-shirt parade." 
At fifteen minutes after ten 
we were to run out on the 
stoop, yelling, and in all 
sorts of costumes, and raise 
a "rough house" to the best 
of our ability. Of course we 
did it, and I think — al- 
though it is against the rules 
for "rats" to think imtil 
after taps — that even that most exacting of masters, the Third Class, were sat- 
isfied with our "rough house." Soon things calmed down, and once more the 
Third Class directed their attention to us. During this tiiye we had many 
pleasures arranged for us ; among them the annual exodus of negroes on Christ- 
mas Day, in which we were the "power behind." We were also the chief 
actors in the snow fight, in which the rats of "A" and "B" companies lined up 
against those of "C" and "D." Many other jaleasures we have had of lesser 
importance. 

The one shadow on our past year was the death of our beloved classmate, 
George Cook Ferrebee, of J^orfolk. He was the most promising man of our 
class, and everyone who came in contact with him learned to love him. He 
was the highest type of a soldier and a gentleman, brave, loving and loyal, 
and everyone who had anything to do with him should feel honored to have 
known such a friend, for indeed he was the friend of all. He was killed in 
the football g-ame with Roanoke College, October the thirtv-first. 




i.L Ni:\'Ki: Fori; 



Wow that the time is coming for us to leave V. M. I., and though most of 
us expect to come back, we learn how we have come to love the old Institute, 
and it is with great regret that we must say good-bye to it, even for a short time. 
All of the trials and hardships through which we have passed have only served 
to streng-then our love for the dear old jjlace, and everyone of us feel proud of 
being a V. M. I. cadet. There can lie no better recommendation for anyone 
than to say that he is a V. M. I. man, and I, for one, am proud to claim V. M. I. 
for my alma mater. 

Our class has had many valuable additions in the men who came in at 
Christmas. We feel assured that they will join us in teaching the ignorant 

Rat Class of 1913 respect for their 
betters. We feel it is oiar duty to 
care for the rat's welfare, and as we 
never shirk such a duty, no matter 
how irksome, we will attend to this 
one to the best of our ability. 

As for Class of 1912, there has 
been no better class in the history 
ol the Institute, and, in fact, none 
(|uite so good. There was no class 
that learned to drill as fast; we have 
had practically no desertions, and 
°""'^' there are few classes that have ever 

been better represented on the athletic teams, as we have had men on both the 
football and basket-ball teams, and will, without doubt, be well represented in 
baseball. As for the members of our class, I believe you would search far 
without finding a more congenial set of felloAvs than the Class of '12. 

Historian, '12. 





The Pie Race 
An After Dinner Pastime, practiced by the more accommodating members of tlie 4tli Class) 



3n Qiemoriam 

(J^eorsE Coofe Jfrrrffaee 

Jf3orfoIfe, IPa. 

H^illeD in jFootfiall (Same 

©ctober 31, 1908 







:|*fll$|:f::^ij$5::ftfl:^^ 



-:-:-i«'M^-!-M~!-!-4-54**i*J; 




MlLITAKY iNSTIlUCTOr.S 



Cactical ac>fficcrs 



COLONEL JIOEKEJ.L iL illLJ.S 

MAJOR E. BARCLAY POAGUE 

CAPTAIN E. B. BURROUGHS 

CAPTAIN H. E. ilECREDY 

CAPTAIN C. H. OWEN 

CAPTAIN W. T. DAVANT 

CAPTAIN M. F. EDWARDS 

CAPTAIN C. S. CARTER 



CommissioncD ©fftcets 



OWSLEY, A. M Captain Company A 

MAGRUDKR, J Captain Company D 

JACOB, H. A Captain Company B 

BRETT, G. H Captain Company C 

BURACKEE, E. M Lieutenant and Adjutant 

PORTER, H.J Lieutenant Company A 

ALEXANDER, G. il Lieutenant Company D 

POLK, G. W Lieutenant Company B 

SCOTT, T. M Lieutenant Company C 

WAGNER, R. F Lieutenant and Quartermaster 

RICHARDSON, J. G Lieutenant Company A 

GANT, R Lieutenant Company D 

JENICINS, C. W Lieutenant Company B 

ircMILLEN, D. R Lieutenant Company C 



IBattalion Organisation 



E. M. BURACKER Lieutenant and Adjutant 

R. F. WAGNER Lieutenant and Quartermaster 

E. HODGE, JR Sergeant Major 



COMPANY A 



COMPANY B 



COMPANY C 



COMPANY D 



CAPTAINS 
A. M. OWSLEY H. A. JACOB G. H. BRETT 



J. MAGRUDER 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS 
H. J. PORTER G. W. POLK T. M. SCOTT G. M. ALEXANDER 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS 
J. G. RICHARDSON C. W. JENKINS D. R. McMILLAN 



FIRST SERGEANTS 
O. M. BALDINGER S. B. AKIN H. P0A6UE 



G. G. WHITE 



SERGEANTS 



SAUNDERS 
TALIAFERRO 
F. JOHNSON 
H. KANE 



TINSLEY 
CROWSON 
YANCEY 
PAYNE 



G. M. BLOW 
J. R. GILLIAM 
C. C. BROWN 
C. B. COULBORN 



CAFFERY 
BENTLEY 
PATTESON 
NICHOLS 



CORPORALS 



W. R. KRAFT 
A. NALLE 
R. S. LANIER 
J. R. MECREDY 
H. W. SMITH 
E. T. DAVANT 
W. S. ROBINSON 



H. B. KINSOLVING 
L. T. GEROW 
L. T. MORRISON 
R. D. MILLER 
V. B. HIRST 
J. G. WHITE 
S. M. MILLNER 



W. S. JACKSON 
C. JNI. BOOTH 
R. M. WILSON 
M. BROWN 
J. R. BEAUCHAMP 
H. D. WALKER 



P. McA. BIEDLER 
N. E. THOMAS 
C. R. DAVANT 
J. JI. HUNDLEY 
C. M. BRISTER 
G. R. COLLINS 



E. E. RICHARDSON W. PARKER 




Miss Owsley 

S PONS UK 



Companp ^ 



CAPTAIN 
OWSLEY (A. J\I.) 

LIEUTENANTS 
PORTER (H. J., JR.) 
EICHARDSOX (J. G.) 

FIRST SERGEANT 
BALDINGER (0. M.) 



SERGEANTS 
SAUNDERS (R. B.) TALIAFERRO (J. C.) 

GILLIAM (J. R) KANE (H. S.) 

CORPORALS 

KRAFT (W. R) JIECREDY (J. E.) 

NALLE (A.) SMITH (H. W.) 

LAMAR (R. S.) DAVANT (E.) 

ROBINSON (W. S.) 



ADAMS (F.) 

BARNES 

BUESCHER 

BOWMAN 

BROWN 

BROOKS 

CAMP 

CANNON 

CALDWELL 

CUMMINGS 

DALTON 

DENNY 

DODD 

DOYLE 

DUFFY 

EWING 

FARRELL 

GATES 

GOEPEL 



PRIVATES 

GROVE 

HAGENBUCH 

HARRILL 

HARRISON 

HORDERN 

JAMES 

KEEN 

LEE (H.) 

LINDSEY 

MACLEAN 

MALSBERGER 

MARTIN 

MINTON 

McCLURE 

NOWUN 

POAGUE (T.) 

PUTRDIE 

KANKIN 

RICHARDS 

RODMAN 

SCHOEFELDT 



SINCLAIR 

SMITH (C.) 

SMITH (0.) 

SMITH (T.) 

SPEER 

STAPLES 

STEVENSON 

STOCKS 

TAYLOR (S.) 

THOM 

THROCKMORTON 

TRISLER 

WALTON 

WHITE (O.) 

WHEELER 

WILSON (W.) 

WRIGHT 

YOUNG 

ZOLLMAN 



101 




Companp 15 



CAPTAIN 
H. A. .JACOH 

LIEUTENANTS 

POLK. G. W. 
JENKINS, C. W. 

FIRST SERGEANT 
AKIN. S. Ji. 



TIXSLKV. .7. \\. 
YANCEY, J. P. 



SERGEANTS 



C'PvOWSON. K. V. 
PAYNE. J. C4. 



CORPORALS 



KlNSOl.YINCi, H. B. 

MILLER. R. D. 

GEROW, L. T. 



HIRST. V. P. 
ilORRISOX, S. F. 
WHITE, I. G. 



JIILLNER. S. .\L 



ADAMS, A. 

ADAMS, C. 

AMERINE 

15ELL, G. 

BlIJAPS 

IM.AXCilAi;]) 

JiUYGE 

BROWN. A. 

BURLISON 

CARSON 

CROCKETT 

CUNXlN(;HAiI 

DASHIELL 

DENTIAM 

EASTHAM, R. 

EDWARDS 

ERSKINE 

ERASER 

GENTRY 

HAGAN 



PRIVATES 

HARRIS 
HOLTON 
HOillCS 
HCLL 
HlTTia; 
INGRAM 
JONES, L. ' 
JOHNSON. A. 
JOHNST-ON, F. 
JULIAN 
KEITH, L. 
LLOYD, E. 
MAYER 
.AIcCLELLAN. : 
MrELUOY 
.McENTEE 
:\IrWHORTKR 
.MINTOX. J. 
JIOORE, L. 
NOELL 
PORTER, J. 



POWELL, J. 

REMBERT 

ROBINSON, ( 

SAMS 

SCHILUG 

SIMPSON 

SMITH, J. 

SMITH, W. 

SNIDOW 

TAYLOR. A. 

TAYLOR, J. 

THOMPSON. 

TRINKLE 

WARD 

WELSH 

WEST 

WHITFIEL]) 

WILSON. G. 

WILSON, C. 

WITT 



102 






Miss Thomas 

SPONSOR 



Companp C 



CAPTAIN 
G. H. BRETT 



LIEUTENANTS 

SCOTT, T. jM. 

McMILLEN, D. E. 



FIRST SERGEANT 
POACiVE, II. 



BLOW, A. M. 
BROWN, C. C. 



SERGEANTS 



COULBOUKN, C. 
JOHNSON, F. L. 



CORPORALS 
JACKSON. W. C. 

BOOTH. C. E. 

WILSON, R. N. 



BEAUCHAIMP. 
\'\'ALKER, D. H. 
BROWN, jr. 



RICHAEDSON, E. E. 



ADAMS. 0. 

BALL, E. 

BARKSDALE 

BECKER 

BEETON 

BLOOMQUIST 

BRANDT 

BRAZELTON 

BRYAN 

CARTER 

CASKIE 

CHILDS 

CHRISTIAN 

COLE 

DAVIDSON 

DILLARD. A. 

DILLARD. W. 

DODSON 

DRAYTON 



PRIVATES 

DRENNEN 

EASTHAM, K. 

ELLISON. A. 

ELY 

FAY 

FENNO 

GANNAWAY 

GANT, E. 

GARDNER 

GERSON 

GIBSON 

HAMNER 

HAYES 

HENDERSON 

JACKSON, H. 

KEITH, M. 

KELLEY 

LEE, S. 

LLOYD. T. 

LONG 



MAHONE, M. 

MAYO 

MINIS 

MISH 

MORRISSETT 

MURPHY 

McCLELLAN, I 

McGEE, C. 

McGEE, R. 

NASH 

REUHRMUND 

RHETT, R. 

SHOTWELL 

SMITH, C. 

STEVENS 

STUCKY 

TEMPLETON 

WOOLARD, S. 

YEATMAN 



103 




Miss Walkeh 

SPONSOR 



Companp D 



CAPTAIN 
JOHN MAGRUDER 

LIEUTENANTS 
G. il. ALEXANDER 

R. GANT 

FIRST SERGEANT 
G. G. WHITE 

SERGEANTS 



CAFFERY, J. P. 
BENTLEY, J. B. 



PATTISON, T. S. 
NICHOLS, J. A. 



CORPORALS 

BIEDLER, P. il. DAVANT, R. 

THOMAS, N. E. BRISTER, C. M. 

HUNDLEY, J. M. COLLINS, G. K. 

PARKER, W. 



ADAMS, W. 

BARKSDALE, A. 

BOWE 

BOYKIN 

BLACKMORE 

BURTON 

BOUGHTON 

CAilPBELL 

CARTER 

CHAPMAN 

CLARK 

COLLIER 

DAVENPORT 

DONALDSON 

DOWNEY 

ERCK 

EAULY 

ELLISON 

EWING 



PRIVATES 

ENGLISH 

GELZER 

GRAMMER 

GREGORY 

GUTHRIE 

HASTIE 

HOBSON 

HOWARD 

HUTCHINSON 

JONES, J. 

JOYNER 

KANE, P. 

KOLL 

LONG, R. 

JIACKALL 

MERIAN 

ISIcRAE 

MILLER, A. 

MOORE, C. 

MOSELEY 

MORRISON, C. 



NOBLE 

ORR 

OWEN 

POWELL 

ROBERTSON 

ROCKWELL 

SETTER 

SEVIER 

SMITH, A. 

SMITH, E. 

SMITH, JI. 

SMITH, R. 

TAYLOR, G. 

THOMPSON, J. 

VENABLE 

WARNER 

WEAR 

WESTMORELAND 

WILSON, P. 



104 



Ecport of tl)e (^oDcrnment Unspectot 



He.vdquakters Virginia JIilitary Institute, 
General Orders) September 2, 1908. 

jSIo. 1 j 

I. The following report is published for the information of all concerned: 
REPORT OF AN INSPECTION OF THE SIILITARY DEPARTMENT OF THE VIRGINIA SIILITARY INSTITUTE 
AT LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA. 

1. Is this institution essentially a militarj' school, or is the military instruction 
merely a single feature of the course? 

Essentially a military school. 

2. What degi'ee of importance is attached to the militarj' instruction by the faculty? 
The highest degi'ee. 

3. Is any change in the War Department classification desirable ? 
No. 

4. If not already classified what classification should be made? 
Already classified. 

5. Is the officer on duty at the college cordially supported by the faculty in the 
matter of military instruction and discipline? Give explicitly your reasons for arriving at 
this conclusion. 

Yes. Conversation with acting superintendent, statement of officer, and my own 
observation. 

6. Are the students required to be continuously in uniform, and do they lead, as 
far as the surrounding conditions can reasonably be expected to permit, a military life? 
In other words, are the conditions such as to impress thein constantlj' with a sense of being 
under militarj' discipline? 

Yes. 

7. To what extent is a military spirit developed and nurtured? 
To the greatest extent possible. 

S. With what degree of zeal is military duty performed? 
With maximum degree of zeal. 

9. What was the general appearance of the cadets at inspection? 
Excellent in eveiy respect. 

10. Have the requirements of Par. 22, G. 0. 155, W. D., 1907, as to time allowed 
the militar}' department been fully complied with? 

Y'es. 

11. Have the requirements of Par. 22, G. 0. 155, W. D., 1907, as to the course of 
instruction been complied with? 

Y'es. 

12. Is the efficiency in infantry instruction and training sufficiently advanced to 
warrant devoting time to instruction in artillery or other branches? 

Yes. 

105 



13. Is the milit«r_y instruction of such extent and thoroughness as to quality the 
average graduate for a commission as a lieutenant of volunteers? 

Yes. All graduates would make most eflBcient officers of volunteers. 

14. Personally interview the students of the graduating class reported as having 
shown special aptitude for military service, and state your opinion as to tlieir qualifications 
sc far as you can ascertain the same from suitable questions in the course of conversation 
with them. Endeavor to form a general idea as to their fondness for military life, the 
extent of their military and historical reading, and their general intelligence, neatness, and 
good manners. Do not report tliem individually, but give your impression of these selected 
cadets as a whole. 

Tliey are intelligent, neat and well mannered, and evince considerable fondness for 
military life. They impress me most favorably. 

15. Is tlie military professor eligible for this detail? (Pars. U and 7, G. 0. 155, 
W. D., 1907.) 

Yes. 

10. Is he satisfactory to the college authorities? 
Entirely so. 

17. Is tlie retired non-commissioned oMicer on dutj' at this institution satisfactory? 
None at this institution. 

18. Do the conditions warrant the continuance of tlie deiail of an ollicer as professor 
of militarj' science and tactics at this institution? 

Y'es. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

I was courteously received by the acting superintendent and afforded every facility 
for making the inspection. 

The cadet corps is organized as a battalion of four companies, numbering at date of 
inspection 206 cadets. 

Two liundred and forty-one cadets (including 7 on guard) were present at inspection 
and 25 absent. Of those reported absent, 2 were on special duty, 11 sick and 12 on leave. 

There is no cadet band, music being furnished by a band of nine pieces pei-manently 
employed by the college. 

The military exercises included review; inspection; escort of the color; parade; 
guard mounting; company drill; battalion drill; Butt's rifle drill; bayonet exercise; field 
problem in attack and defense of position; standing gun drill with field guns and howitzers; 
litter drill; and signaling with flag and heliogiaph. 

The cadet quarters and mess hall were inspected, class parade witnessed, and class 
room and gj'mnasium visited. 

The review and all other ceremonies were almost faultlessly executed. 

The cadets are well .set-up, march with splendid step and alignment, and are at all 
times soldierly and in bearing. 

All brasses were well polished and the equipment, as well as the clothing, was without 
exception in excellent condition. 

The rifles generally were very good to excellent, tho\igh there were three with dirty 
bores in Company "C," and one in each of the other three companies. 

The battalion was commanded in turn by Captain Hills, the military instructor, and 
bj' each of the cadet captains. Two or tliree n.inor mistakes were made in the battalion 

106 



extended order drill and in the platoon drill of two of the companies, but on the whole the 
battalion as well as the company drills in close and extended order were excellent. 

The bayonet exercise was very good indeed, and Butt's rifle drill excellent. 

The exercises in advance and rear guard and outpost were confined to the parade 
ground and all distances and intervals were necessarily vei-j- much reduced. The extensions 
were quickly made and conformed to the service manuals except as above noted. Very little 
benefit can, however, be derived from exercises in minor tactics under such conditions. 

In the field problem in attack and defense of position, no assumptions were made 
which the terrian did not justify. The fire discipline was good, proper use was made of 
cover, and the work of the cadets generally was quite creditable. 

The standing g-un drill with four 12-pdr. Ji. L. S. B. howitzers (the property of the 
college) and two 3.2" B. L. field guns was excellent. Tlie field guns were inspected and 
found to be in excellent condition. 

The litter drill was very good. 

Messages were sent and received correctly with the flag. The heliographs were set 
up and attempts made to use them, but clouds obscured the sun to sucl\ an extent as to 
make it impossible. Tlie cadets apparently understood the operation of the heliograph. 

The class room was visited during recitation in Beach's Militarj' Field Engineering. 
The recitations show that the theoretical instruction is comprehensive and thorough. 

The work in the gymnasivun is of a high order and aids materially in the physical 
development and set-up of the cadets. Attendance of fourth class is compulsory for one hour 
daily, Saturday and Sunday excepted. The gymnasium is well equipped in every way. 

The Virginia Military Institute is modeled after the United States Military Academy 
and closely follows its methods in all departments. The professors and officers hold com- 
missions in the Virginia militia and wear unifoi'ni at all times. Six assistant professors, 
all of whom are graduates of the Institute, act as tactical officers and live in the barracks. 

The discipline is superb and the institution is imbued with a thoroughly good mili- 
tary tone. 

Captain Mills is well qualified for college duty and lias the respect and confidence of 
the cadets and the faculty. Great credit is due him for bis excellent work at the Virginia 
Military Institute. 

P. C. IlAiiEis, Captain, General Staff, 

Inspector. 

II. As a result of the foregoing ve])ort the \\ar Department lias designated the Vir- 
ginia Military Institute as "Dintinguished Institution, 1908,"' making the fifth consecutive 
appointment to this honor. 

III. The superintendent congratulates the corps on its excellent showing as seen from 
the report of the inspector given above, and expresses his personal gratification that the high 
prestige of the school has been so suecessfullj' maintained. 

By command of 

Brigadier General Nichols, 

Superin tendcnt. 
St. J. R. Marshall, Captain and Adjutant, V^. M. I. 



15u0teD 



SERGEANTS 



MACLEAN 

GEAMMEE 
PAYNE 

ENGLISH 



MAYO 
JIcCLELLAN 
WHEELEE 

GATES 



CORPOEALS 

BECKER 

McENTEE 

MISH 




HALT! 





-^^^~ 
^ ^ 



The Washington Trip 



WITHOUT doubt the greatest event of the year was the trip to Wash- 
ington, where, on March 4th, for the first time in the history of the 
Virginia Military Institute, the corps of cadets took part in an 
inauguration. Although the fact that this was the only trijD the corps had 
during the year made every cadet look forward to it with pleasure, the last 
touch to the enthusiasm felt in the corps over it was added when the announce- 
ment was made that the battalion would be presented by the ISTew York alumni 
with a dui^licate of the battle flag under which the corps fought at New Market. 
In spite of the continued i^rayers of the men, the day of departure dawned 
cold and wet. Even the elements, however, could not by their opposition dampen 
the ardor of the corps, and when the battalion entrained at Lexington at seven 
o'clock, a merrier throng would have been hard to find. Thanks to the gener- 
osity of Mr. George W. Stevens, President of the Chesapeake and Ohio Rail- 
road, the journey was made on a special train, the comforts of which stripped 
the long day of travel of the terrors it would otherwise have held for the men. 
Scarcely a stop was made until the train drew up at Virginia Avenue and 
Fifteenth Street, S. W., where the cars discharged their burden of cadets. 

To those who visited Washington for the first time the end of the journey 
was a disappointing one. Obscured by the low clouds, from which were already 
descending the first drojjs of the downpoiir which so much impeded the parade 
the next day, the golden cupola of the Library failed to shine its wonted greet- 
ing, and even the nearer Monument was invisible. The battalion was quickly 
formed, and after marching in file imtil the oj^en street was reached, it wheeled 



into column of squads, in which formation it proceeded to the ISTew Masonic 
Temple, where quarters had been assigned. 

The inclement weather prevented the performance of the im])ressive cere- 
monies attendant on the presentation of the New Market flag. When the cer- 
emony did take place, however, after the companies had reached their quarters, 
it could scarcely have been more thrilling. 

Hon. John S. Wise, of the New York alumni, turned the flag over to 
General Bell, Chief of Staff of the U. S. A., in a graceful and eloquent speech 
of introduction. General Bell, who has never missed an opjwrtunity to honor 
us, paid many tributes to the cadets, both past and ]n'esent. He spread the 
folds of the flag, exhibiting its decorations — the Virginia arms on one side, a 
])icture of Washington on the other, — and dwelt on the sterling qualities of the 
heroes who battled beneath its pure white silk on the bloody field of New 
Market. The deafening bursts of ap])]ause, which at frequent intervals 
drowned the utterances of the speaker, showed how strongly his words reached 
the hearts of his hearers. The audience was in great part composed of alumni, 
among them a number of New Market cadets. 

At the conchision of his remarks General Bell turned over the flag to 
General Nichols, who acco]ited it on behalf of the Institute. It was carried in 
the inaugural parade instead of the blue Virginia flag, which has hitherto ap- 
peared on the left of the stars and stripes. 

After the ceremony had been disposed of the cadets were dismissed for 
several hours of freedom. The weather had changed for the worse since the 
arrival of the cor]is. The ground was covered with several inches of snow, 
which was of just the right consistency to hold the water on the streets. All 
uight long conditions kept getting worse, and the next dawn ushered in a must 
impropitious day for an inauguration. 

Reveille and breakfast over, the men were again release<l, with urdevs to 
re]iort in quai'ters by noon. At twelve o'clock the battalion marched to diiniev, 
aud first call for parade sounded immediately on its return. Overcoats, with 
white waist and cross belts, were W(u-n, a unifi)rni which gav? the corps as good 
an appearance as it has ever ])resentcd. 

Promptly at one o'clock the battalidu was formed, aud uuirched away in 
connnand of Colonel Mills, who had ordere to be in iiosition by two. Arrived at 
Third Street, S. E., ready to wheel into the parade at a moment's notice, the 
havoc wrought in the well-made ])lans of the Grand Marshal by the weather 
and other unforeseen contingencies was at once apparent. Wet to the knees 
from their long march, the men were forced to wait two hours, while the organi- 
zations whose place lay ahead in the parade got in line and marched away. 



To the imjjatient cadets, standing half frozen in a position exposed to the 
full sweep of the northeast gale which was blowing, the order to move seemed 
slow in coming. At last it did come, however, and the grey and red-clad battal- 
ion took its place in line. At its head marched the Stonewall Brigade Band, of 
Staunton, an organization which, with its good music and appearance, was an 
honor to the corjas. 

Throughout the parade the bearing of the cadets was matchless ; the 
platoons held perfect lines, and the general appearance of the corps was ex- 
tremely good. Its progress up the avenue was marked by continued applause 
from the thousands of people banked on the sidewalks. That the men did hold 
good lines and march well in other resjDects was a great achievement, for the 
streets were in a fearful condition, the guides and other meu on the extreme 
ends of the platoons being often forced to walk in water up to their knees for 
blocks at a time. V. M. I. well defended her title of "The West Point of the 

South" on March the fourth. 
In the evening the cadets 
were in the foremost ranks 
of the frolickers, who enjoyed 
the carnival to which the city 
was turned over. Many at- 
tended the performances at 
the various theaters, but by 
far the greater number sought 
their pleasure on the avenue. 
Their grey figures could be 
seen wherever the fun was 
thickest, whether threading 
the mazes of the "Snake 
Dance," in the wake of some 
wandering band, or among 
the gay loiterers on the crowd- 

A Corner of Our Washington Quartkks g(J pavements. 

Reveille on the fifth awoke a tired and worn-out crowd. After breakfast 
the men busied themselves in getting in shape for leaving their equipment, 
bedding, etc., and at ten o'clock the corps was marched to Union Station, where 
after a wait of an hour the cadets entrained for Lexington. The journey home 
was accomplished with no less comfort than had been the one to Washington. 
On its arrival in Lexington the battalion was again formed and marched to the 
Institute through the crowds which had assembled to welcome it back. 





NKW IIc.iSl'lTAL 




New Che.mical LAUuiuiTOiii" 



Improvements, 1908-1909 



THE present session has been marked by the erection of two new buildings, 
or rather the erection of one, and extensive alterations and additions to 
the other. The new Chemical Laboratory was designed by John Kevan 
Peebles, of K^orfolk, the contract being let to C. W. Hancock & Sons, of Lynch- 
burg, for $30,000.00. It is three stories high, with a large and well-lighted 
basement. The foundations are of limestone ; the trimmings, sand-stone, and 
the building proper is made of brick, with steel framework. The outside is 
stuccoed. On the first floor are lecture-rooms, offices and storerooms. On the 
second floor are lecture-rooms, quantitative laboratory, qualitative laboratory, 
mineralogical laboratory and storerooms. The third floor will be equipped for 
a drawing academy ; steam heat and electric light throughout ; slate black- 
boards in all section rooms. 

The alterations and additions to the Hospital represent an outlay of 
$9,000.00, W. B. Snead & Co., of Lynchburg, being the contractors. The work, 
which was begun in September, was comj^leted in January. The hospital now 
has twelve ward rooms, one emergency ward, one ward for contagious cases, 
rooms for etherizing and operating, kitchen, and convalescents' dining-room. 
The two modern steam-heated solariums are a constant source of comfort and 
delight to the convalescents. Steam heat and electric lights throughout ; electric 
call bells in every room, and baths on each floor. It is a hospital of which the 
school may well be proud. 




Winter Scenks 



Reminiscences of a Rat 



NATURALLY, the story of rathood would be in the nature of a tale, and 
the following wonderfully soporific discoui-se will possess such merits, 
I am sure, that each of my readers will regard it open-mouthed — in 
one prodigious yawn. 

Most narrators grow amazingly sentimental and ornate on occasions like 
this, and prate of the fragrant weed and dreamy hours with Lady Nicotine, but 
here I shall substantially differ with them and tell you that I scribbled this 
after an internally tempestuous half hour with a bad cigar and a stomach pump. 



Once upon a time, in the days of dragons and fire-eating and rat-beating 
monsters, a pale and callow youth, whom father had occasionally caressed with 

a club, left the parental wood- 
shed for the Institute, with 
never a thought that he 
should ever lug an ancient 
fire-lock in trudging count- 
less wabbly miles as the com- 
bined front and rear ranks 
of the Dumb Squad. 

"There's many a fine Italian hand 
That grinds an organ." 

—Three ^yeek.^i. 

So one sultry September 
morning the train backed la- 
zily out of those beautiful 
Blue Ridge Mountains — see 
catalog, not the mountains — 
and delivered its bu.rden loose 

on Lexington, whose main thoroughfares were as quiet as the streets of Pompeii. 

The suit cases, which tinkled sweetly within — for Staunton is very wet — were 

affectionately stowed in the station, and we all hastened forth to see the town 

which was to enfold us within its sleepy jDortals for ten well-nigh endless months. 

The people looked at us with, I thought, almost an expression of pity. Now I 

know it was. 

At the Institute, a gentleman, clad in snowy white, wrinkled a corrugated 

brow at me; emitted several gutteral sounds — presiimably of welcome; took 




FATMCR HftP Ott(\&iol>iALLY 
CftRESSED WITH A ClV/D " 



all the money I had, and sent me down to have my Bertillon measurements 
taken. Several weeks later, as from a standing posture I lovingly viewed a 
chair, I was overcome with the deiJressiiig logic that first one got the Glad 
Hand, and then the Black Hand. 

The month of arrival is, to my mind, almost an absolute blank. In fact, 
it is a blankety, blank, blank period in my young life. 

Pardon me, dear reader, if I now obtrude a few personal facts and 
"figures" into this, that you may better understand some of the caloric and 
caustic observations from the gentlemen, called corps, who assayed to explain 
to me a number of things that they didn't know. The Avord "corps" kej^t re- 
curring, and, after a few days, I understood, for I discovered that, two third- 
class corps could easily make one fourth-class corpse, which, let it be understood, 
they tried most commendably to do. Be it remembered that my legs have their 
own sweet roundabout way of reaching Mother Earth ; again, that my general 
outline bore a remarkable similarity to that peculiarly dignified and stately 
insect, known in bug circles as the ''inaniis rdigiosa," otherwise "Devil's 
Horse." 

My drill master, for I have mentioned that I, singly and alone, disported 
in the Dmub Squad, soon began to regard me with an exj^ression of hopelessness 
and utter despair, and would often consult others over my 
singular inaptitude to grasp the general military scheme 
or any of its jjhases. For this he'd frequently grasp a 
bayonet and administer — well, never mind what, nor where. 
Quoth he, "Mister, you walk like an old horse in a corn- 
field," addirg, almost pathetically, "Say, Kat, can't you 
learn f ' 

Sundays we went to. church, desjjite loud prayers for 
rain which ascended to an unheeding Rain Maker. Fre- 
quently such beseechings became so clamorous, so tumult- 
uous, and even violent, that the Commandant would pei'- 
sonally investigate these solicitations for a downpour. 
But it seldom rained, and oft' we went to church, to be 
edified and ficcasionally awakened by the Sky Pilot as he 
vainly endeavored to prevail against an ever-increasing 
and Niagara-like snorefest, by some profoundly entertain- 
descriptions of "Sin, stalking abroad through our 
land, blowing green smoke from his nostrils, my sisters, 
fanning himself with his tail, my brethren, arm in arm with the broken hearts 
and legs of the widows and orphans which line the bleachina' sands of the Sea 




WDumb' .5quao 



of Wreck, Euin and Rum, my lambs." Such a metaphorical curiosity was 
enough to murder sleep. After the usual plea to the unsaved, and as the choir 
sang "Shout the Glad Tidings," each old cadet would greatly augment their 

efforts by a highly perceptible 
'^^^ nudge in the back of the rat 

just in front, and in an awe- 
some whisper, hiss forth, ''Sing, 
damn it, sing." The results 
were most gratifying; the heav- 
enly chorus was swelled to 
alarming proportions; old ladies 
smiled blandly at the "great in- 
terest of those noble young 
men," and never knew the real 
cause for all that religious fer- 
Twe HbAvCNlY Chorus ^,gj. 

The orchards of East Lexington offered glorious opportunities to those of 
an appropriative and retentive nature, and many a Sabbath afternoon have the 
sighing branches of the old ap]de tree held cajoacity congregations of omnivor- 
ous cadets who, be it said, sighed later in the evening. We were sent down to 
the apple orchards as the duly accredited representatives of the old cadets, and 
cordially entitled to everything we received — but the apples. Our perform- 
ances invariably evoked from the owner a i:)icturesque dissertation, highly sur- 
charged with old Virginia profanity. 




Soon after our arrival, the Spectre of Prohibition loomed 
up and laid its parching finger on everybody's family demijohn. 
The Great Drought was sujDerinduced by one member of thf 
class trying to corner and hold down the entire output of the 
little old gin mill. The Faculty passed around a pledge ; every- 
body signed ; and thirsted from that time hence. 



Of course, at Christmas, some of us got fruit cakes that were spiced a 
little with "Oh! Where is My Wandering Boy To-night T' and if ihey were 
discreetly and judiciously squeezed, it was possible to extract a jigger of joy. 



An inordinate and chronic appetite accompanies each cadet ; hence every 
day possessed three redeeming features, — breakfast, dinner and supper. The 
fare was of that sturdy variety which might best be described as poor, but 
honest. Mealtime always, afforded convenient occasions for the old cadets to 
be furnished diversion by rats in varying stages of speechless terror. As said 
before, I embraced all the embarrassing obesity of a straw, and never shall I 
forget the observation of a third classman, who, after viewing me for several 

moments in an absorbed 
scrutiny, ventured this in- 
teresting assertion : "Hell, 
Mister, if you'd eat an olive, 
it would show." The rats 
were assigned the duties of 
serving the old cadets with all 
the dainties which adorned 
our groaning board, and 
many a time have I been 
confronted with that ap- 
palling mathematical puzzle 
of serving one oyster to 
six upper classmen. This 
culinary mystery was gener- 
ally within a recejjtacle 
not unlike a bathtub, and the 
disheartening, yet frantic, 
searches which we have made in its briny depths for that lonesome oyster, 
whose presence alone lent it the toothsome surname of stew, would have been 
amusing, had there not been so much tragedy involved. The meat was invari- 
ably rare ; in fact, one might say, it was jDositively seldom. The old cadets 
were continually asking the rats leading questions, which always led to the 
direst and most dreadful consequences. One evening the innocent inquiry of 
whether I had ever beheld a hi2323opotamus came near causing me to figure as 
the main subject of an obituary. When I answered in the affirmative, a corpu- 
lent gentleman at the head of the table exploded with a loud report, as he evi- 
dently considered it a personal reflection upon his u:'ar-Adonis-1il-e figure, and 
I was invited up to his room, later, to be set upon with instruments capable of 
producing slow but certain death. At our table we had the original dumb 
waiter, who revelled in the distressing delusion that we were the ones to wait, 

120 




'If you'o eAT ftw ouve it woulp Stt«w' 



not he, 
of Mr. 



ISTeither can I forget those historic eggs, representing the best efforts 
and Mrs. Hen some time in the Stone Age. 

There was at the Institute a small 
life-saving station, called the Sutler's, 
where the pangs of hnnger conld be ex- 
changed for other pangs by the con- 
sumption of such a digestive symphony 
as hamburgers, pie, ice-cream and pos- 
tal cards. Sometimes rabbit could be 
obtained, and this delicacy became 
much in demand, until one day some rat 
discovered a few black hairs, and then 
yellow hairs, on one of these animals, 
and the re^Dort became disseminated that 
we had been enjoying all that was mor- 
tal of the Institute felines. Next, some wretch suggested that, perhaps, it was 
possibly another variety besides house cat. At once the demand for rabbit 
dwindled, and we returned to our former habit of extracting the maximum 
amount of nourishment from the old cow Hydrant's milk. 




*' »nosE li«s.ToR\e t&<jS 




TrtE r'-aftsi Prii-dTE PRtPAfi'i to ■)« 
(The nitjht- Kt"*^") 

The officers of the Y. M. C. A. used to call upon the rats and extend invi- 
tations to this Heavenly Annex with a bayonet and much accompanying warmth. 
The attendance increased most satisfactorily, as this was Christianity literally 
offered and applied. 

A very popular pastime with insomnious upper classmen, especially on 
nights when kegs of Conversation Water would be received from L;^Tichburg, 
was to amuse themselves by holding a sort of Garden-of-Eden Marathon at 3 



a. m., in whicli the sprinters were confined exelnsively to rats. Onr apparel 
usually consisted in being wrapj^ed in silence and, in comparison, Salome's 
costume would have been called an overcoat, except on the occasion when she 
wore — her hair in a braid. Those who rode brooms may justly lay claim that 
they were the real and only night-riders. 

Every time it snowed, the Third Class immediately arranged for a snow- 
ball fight between the rats, and we accordingly engaged in mortal combat for 
their delectation. At the signal of hostilities the air was full of snowballs, caps, 
black eyes, tingling ears and cuss words. No one but an upper classman can 
appreciate the exquisite humor of the situation when you get hit in your eye. 

In April Lexington was visited by a circus, and we were allowed to attend. 
Xo untoward incident occurred luitil a blare of trumpets annoimced the entrance 
of Mile. DeLeon, lithographed — though, fortunately not photographed — as the 
world's most graceful and daintiest equestrienne. A concerted groan from the 
cadets greeted the "little lady" who, it must be 
stated, had seen better days, and lots of them. She 
resembled Mrs. Father Time, and as she trij^ped 
through the mazes of the Spring Song on the back 
of her steed, an exj^ression of appreciation in the 
form of a lemon went hurling at her, to be imme- 
diately followed by a perfectly flattering lemon 
shower. Her old horse, who evidently received 
his instructions as the right guide of a hearse, was 
aroused from his dozing walk to such an extent 
that the act had to be abruptly terminated lest 
the decrepit dame should be injured. In the 
menagerie a sight of much interest was the feed- 
ing of the animals. A choleric lion gazed sleepily 
cut at us and his keeper began glibly to recite how 
"a little girl was killed only last week by this 
man-eater reaching through the bare and biting 
her head ofi'." At this juncture the nld lion tot- 
„„ ,„5TaucT,ON 5 , teringly raised iiimseli, opened his mouth, dis- 

OF fl »E«»iE •■ playing a toothless head, and whined softly for his 

bread and milk. We swallowed a grin and returned to barracks, content with 
the knowledge that there was, at least, one liar in the world besides the man 
who writes catalogs for inilitarv schools. 




On the 15th of May, the anniversary of the Battle of Xew Market, white- 
duck trousers were donned, and in order to fittingly enshrine this day in our 
memories, the old cadets, armed with clubs, ramrods, and possibly a few scatter- 
ing shot-guns, lined the stoops for a combined attack on the rats fruin tlie rear, 
bent on the laudable purpose of increasing the number who sleep in the V. M. I. 
cemetery. A jjair of white trousers are not exactlj* transparent, but for all the 
good they did that May evening, they might as well have not been there. 

"What's the use of trying to tell of those glorious days at Finals, when 
every fellow was suffering with acute happiness, moving sidewalks and revolving 
streets ? You wouldn't remember if I did. Selah. 




IN DANCrTi^ 




A Corner op Reading Room in New Library 
Replica of the Neto Market Flag 




Dk. Ekid White 



0iiD#eat JDops 



September 11-12 Opening Hops 

December 4-5 Thanksgiving Hops 

January 1-2 New Year Hops 

February 22 Sub-Professors' Hops 

April 16-17 Easter German and Hop 



127 



5UmER 




SCHOOL 



Sponsok: Who? 

SoKG: "Hail! Hail! The Gang's All Here." 

Flower: "The Wild Irish Rose." 

Motto : Do not do to-day what you can put off until to-morrow. 

C'OLOK : Blue. 

CAPT. R. RAGLAXD 

MAJ. E. B. POAGUE 
CAPT. W. W. LaPEADE 
CAPT. A. G. CAMPBELL 



GRANT, '08 

WICKHAM, '08 
OWSLEY, '09 
SCOTT, 'on 

CROCKETT, '09 
MINTON, '09 

POAGUE, T., '09 
JACOB, '09 

DOYLE, H., '09 



WHITE, 0. B., '09 
BEETT, '09 

POAGUE, H., '10 
ANDEESON, J., '10 
ENGLISH, '10 
MACLEAN, '10 
ADAMS, H., '10 
ADAMS, F., '11 
ELY, '11 




I fancy I see a smile oversiDread the face of some gvey-haired alumnus, 
as his eye falls npon this monument to a "forlorn hope" ; yet I wonlcl ask that 
you do not pass us by hastily, as unworthy nf ynur notice. Bear with me but 
a little while, in order that I may attempt to enumerate to you our trials and 
tribulations, and j)erhaps mention a few of our virtiies, for otherwise they would 
pass into oblivion undiscovered. In the end I am sure you will be forced to 
admit that we have some redeeming characteristic. 

On August Sth, last, the incoming trains began to deposit in the quiet 
town of Lexington a niunber of sad, but very determined, yomig men. Sad be- 
cause they had left home and sweetheart for a life of drudgery, yet determined 
to regain what they had lost in previous years of neglect. They came from all 
points of the compass, even from the remotest parts, until their numbers were 
increased to eighteen. The Summer School was then complete. 

They slept in barracks, when they slept, and ate at the different boarding 
houses in Lexington. The latter they did with more regularity than the former. 
They attended classes from nine until one. They did well, for they were prompt 
and attentive. 

The time passed quickly and pleasantly, for there was always something 
to do ; — riding, driving, swimming and roller-skating being the principal form 
of recreation. Some of the more wayward students played pool, while several 
of the most reckless ones made love to the Lexington calic. These were promptly 
threatened with expulsion by the student body. 

September came, and with it the examinations. Many of their Lexington 
friends predicted a complete failure for the entire enrollment, but they were dis- 
appointed. Eighty-five per cent of the examinations taken were passed, and 
every member of the Summer School was able to continue with his class. 

Out of the eighteen cadets who retiirned to Lexington in August, six made 
places for themselves on the varsity football eleven, and as many others were 
to be foimd on the various other teams. 

And now, in saying farewell, I would suggest as a remedy to those cadets 
suffering from failure and overburdened by deficiencies, return to Lexington 
next summer, and conscientiously dose yourself with Ragland's Remedies for 
broken-down cadets. It will make a new man of you. Long live the Summer 
School ! 





The Lttlc fellow 



Athletics 



ATHLETKVS at V. il. I. occniiw a jx'culiar jiosition. At uo other .scIkhiIs 
in the eonntry, with the exception of the government schciols at West 
Point and Annapolis, do the athletic aspirants labor nnder snch diffi- 
culties and discouraging situations, dvie to the demands of rigid military dis- 
ciiDline. The system of academic and military duties has been worked up to a 
fine point. The instructors know just how much time each cadet has if he 
applies himself diligently. Using this knowledge, they assign duties that are 
calculated to leave little time for the pursuit of athletics. 

The maximum time allowed on the athletic field is from 2 to 4 p. m., and 
the cadet is h^cky, indeed, who has his lessons so arranged that he can practice 
this whole two hours. The more frequent case is that of a cadet granted permis- 
sion to leave the section room, or his field or laljoratory work, at three o'clock. 
He rushes to the dressing room and emerges in a few minutes equipped for prac- 
tice. This is one time that he appreciates the knack of rapid di'essing learned 
at reveille. It is needless to say that the short hour of practice is utilized to the 
utmost ; at the first call for drill he makes a run for the bath-house, removes his 
athletic uniform, takes a shower, and is fully dressed and in ranks in the short 
sj)ace of ten minutes. You observe the knack again. If he is not in ranks at 
the end of that ten minutes (when the assembly is blown), he is assigned a 
night i^enalty tour, which is quite an encouragement ( T) to the worn and tired 
athlete. At other schools, when practice is ended, the men undress leisurely, are 
well rubbed down, and when thoroughly rested return to their quarters. Here 
a man will be practicing on the athletic field at 4 o'clock, and in the midst of 
an hour's drill at 4.12. Those who witness our athletic contests do not realize 
that every V. M. I. athlete has these discouraging conditions to contend with. 

Athletics at V. M. T. are pure college athletics ; we pride ourselves upon the 
fact that no one has ever been able to say we have played a "Ringer" u]ion any 
team. ISTo form of college athletics is without fault, Imt there is a distinct 
line between clean, hard-fought games, and games in which rough ]ilay is 
indulged in when the referee is not looking. Tt is rare, indeed, that one of our 
men is penalized for rough-play. 



The iiabits of restraint, self-control, self-confidence and dogged persistence, 
fostered by the rigorous military system, have shown themselves repeatedly in 
the arena of college athletics. In every branch our men have won distinction 
and honor. The names of many, all Southern Stars, have been loudly cheered 
ujion hard-fought football fields by their loyal fellow-cadets. 

It is but fitting that such spirit among athletics should be repeated among 
the other cadets. Our reputation for rooting is wide-spread, and the reputation 
is that we root, whether winning or losing, and loudest in the latter case. The 
theory of the cadets is, that if they get dejected over defeat how much more right 
have the struggling team to do so ? And the best they can do is make a racket, 
which they i^roceed to do. 

It is indeed discouraging to a man when he makes a faulty play to hear 
caustic remarks from the side lines ; but to hear the cheery words, "That's 
all right, old m^an, we are all with you," or nine rahs, with his name on the 
end, makes him determined to keep everlastingly at it. It is such spirit and 
such conduct that has won for V. M. I. her place in the world of college 
athletics. 




CAI'T. JI. li. CuKSE 



Graduate Manager of Athletics 



CAPT. :\L B. CORSE, V. j\I. I.'s graduate manager of athletics, is r.ne of 
the best type of Institute men. He graduated in 1885, and has always 
shown the greatest love for his alma mater. Since 1902 he has filled the 
position of graduate manager with the greatest satisfaction to all connected 
with the Institute. The position is one without salary or recomiJense, and one 
that means lots of hard work to the man who undertakes it. Too often he is 
overlooked amid the excitement of the athletic contests which he has arranged. 

Captain Corse has not limited his attention solely to the advancement 
of athletics at Y. jVI. I., but by words and pen he has endeavored to bring the 
numerous advantages of the school before the pul)lic. 

A brief biography of his life reads thus : 

Born Alexandria, Va., May 8, lS6fi. Son of Gen. M. D. Corse, Com- 
mander Corse's Brigade, Pickett's Division. Entered V. M. I. Augvist, 1881. 
Graduated 1885. Taught 1885 to 1888 at Fishburne's School. At the 
University of Virginia 1888 to 1890, inclusive. Practiced as an Analytical 
Chemist in Roanoke, Va., 1890 to 1893. Sub-professor 189.3 to 1897. 
Married Miss Elise Senmies, daughter of late Col. T. M. Semmes, Professor 
Modern Languages V. M. I., in December, 189(3. Living in tf>wn of Lexington 
since June, 1897, when connection with V. M. J. was discontinued. Proprietor 
of McCrum Drug Company. Director Bank of Rockbridge ; Director Huger- 
Davidson-Sale Wholesale Grocery Company; Director Rockbridge Lime & 
Stone Company ; Treasurer Rockbridge Alum Springs Company. 

Any man who has worn the cadet gray cannot fail to admire and respect 
a man whose attachment to this old school is so strong and sincere. It is one 
thing for an alumnus to stand on the parade grotmd at finals and yell, when the 
battalion passes in review, with martial music, l>ut quite another for one to 
work month after month, quietly, unassumingly, for the general good of the 
school, and athletics in particular. We cadets who have known Captain Corse 
personally have an admiration and love for him that will never grow cold. 



atfiletic IBoarD 



ATHLETIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FROM FACULTY 

H. C. FOED President 

W. T. POAGUE Vice-Presidext 

M. B. CORSE Secretary axd Treasi'rer 

FB.OM CADETS 
CLASS PRESinEXTS, MANAGERS AND CAPTAINS OF TEAMS 

SCOTT, '09 

CROWSON, '10 

MACLEAN ( Football ) 

GRAMilER (Baseball) 

McMILLEN 

OWSLEY 

JACOBS 

GEROW, 11 

HASTIE, '12 

PORTER (Basket-ball) 

Al.EXANBER (Gyiiiiiasium) 



Football 



WHEN football practice began this year, the outlook for a good team was 
particularly bad. Eight of the 'OS varsity had been lost by graduation, 
and several of the most promising scrubs had not returned. Our one 
hope was Coach Roller. In '08 Mr. Roller had built up one of the best defensive 
teams in the South Atlantic States, as well as a snappy and tricky team on the 
defensive ; so we had every reason to rest our hopes in him, and they proved to 
be well founded. With practically raw material he developed a team which 
even eclipsed the one of the preceding year. He was ably helped, however, by 
Assistant Coach "Pat" Krebs and by Captain Doyle, '08 ; Captain Mecredy, 
'06 ; and Mr. Studye, '0(j. Mr. Roller was lucky also in having such a captain to 
back him as Tom Poague. This is the fourth year that "Bully" Poague has won 
his monogram in football. He was elected captain, unanimously, on the field 
at the close of the Davidson game in Lynchburg last year, and his leadership of 
the team this year has proven the wisdom of that choice. He not only "held 
doAvn" the position of end for four years, but played star ball in all of them. 
OpiDOsing teams soon learned that it was useless to run a play over Poagnie, for, 
if he didn't get his man, he cut down the whole interference time after time. 
The opening game, with William and Mary, resulted in an easy victory 
for V. M. I. of 21 to 0. This shows how rapidly the material had been whipped 
into sha])e; for, in the preceding week, the University of Virginia had only 
beat William and Mary 11 to 0. Hampden-Sidney ne.xt fell an easy victim by 
a score of 40 to 0. In the next game, with St. John's College of Annapolis, we 
received quite a sur])rise, the score being 10 to 2 in their favor. Of course most 
games that a team loses are usually attributed to hard luck by the losing team ; 
but with McMillen, Scott and MacLean out of the game, we think that the re- 
sults of that game can well be attributed to a "reverse of fortune" at least. This 
game was the first and last time in two years that a team has scored on us on our 
own field. Staunton Military Academy then went under, the score being oT to 
0. Then came the hard-fo\ight V. P. I. game. 

The team landed in Roanoke with the determination to "die hard" if they 
did die. V. P. I. had been playing their usual "Ringers," but that did nor 
hinder them from having their usual good team. Nevertheless, we gave them a 
decided surprise. At the start the game looked bad for us. V. P. I. umde the 



first touch-down after about five minutes of play. This touch-down was nuide 
on a fluke, however, the ball being accidently blocked on a punt by one of our 
own men, and V. P. I. fell on it on our fifteen-yard line. Instead of discourag- 
ing, this seemed to make V. M. I. take a brace, and for the rest of the gamp 
V. P. I. was mostly on the defensive. Before the end of the first half Hddg-inn 
succeeded in making a jjlace kick, making a score of 10 to for V. P. 1., and 
thei'e was no further scoring on either side. The only reason that can l)c 
attributed to V. M. I. failing to score is that her offensive work was not as 
strong as her defensive work. The latter, however, could hardly be beat. 
Again and again we held V. P. I. for downs, and four attempts for goals from 
field were made by V. M. I., but to no purpose; their goals seemed to be 
"hoodooed." Several coaches were present, and most of the pa])ers gave us 
credit for outplaying V. P. I. throughout the game. 

Then came what proved to be our last game of the season, with Roanoke 
College. We were well ahead of Roanoke, when, toward the close of the first 
half, the saddest accident in the history of the Institute occurred. This was 
the death of J. Cooke Ferebee, killed accidently while carrying the ball, after 
a brilliant run, to within ten yards of Roanoke's goal. On being tackled the 
force with which he was running twisted him around and he fell, striking the 
back of his head and causing concussion of the brain, from which he died a 
few minutes after. The second half was never ]ilayed and football was aban- 
doned for the rest of the year. 





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jTootfiall Ceam 



OFFICERS 

POAGUE, T Captain 

SAUNDERS Assistant Manager 

JACOB Manager 

Jl. C. S. ROLLER, '01 Coach 

LINE UP 

POAGUE, T Left Eiul 

POAGUE. H. ) -o- ,<- 17 1 

I. Kight End 

SCOTT I 

AJ.EXANDER Left Tackle 

PATTISON Right Tackle 

MINTON Left Guard 

CLEMMER Right Guard 

McMILLEN Quarterback 

DASHIELL Quarterback 

">=VANT, R. I Left Halfback 

FEREBEE j 

PORTER Right ?lalfback 

l^lAcLEAN Fullback 

SUBSTITUTES 
POLK 

DOWNEY 
(iATES 

VENABLE 
MOSELY 
ENGLISH 




Saindkrs, Ass't Mia;. 





LABBY 5/M-l 



DRUTU 3 





And fffe fir^f httBr- of/h name , 



Tnc Madame: ' 



IBA5EBALL 




Baseball 



BASEBALL, like the spring itself, each year comes with increased attraction, 
awaking enthusiasm just a little greater than that of last season. The 
first warm days bring to light of day dnsty bats, gloves and aiikle bracas 
jnst as surely as the sap flows ujaward in the trees. Baseball is unique. No- 
body can remain indifferent to its exciting momenta: ''Two strikes and the 
bases full," followed by a long drive, will cause a grandfather to dance a jig 
on his cane. Any man or woman (e\'en the dignified clergyman) who is young 
enough to reach the ball grounds is young enough to root for his favorite team. 
It is a part of the game, just as essential and invohmtary as sliding to second 
base. Football will call forth its energetic applause at intervals, but there is 
an excitement in baseball, with its raj^idity and unexpectedness of action, which 
is irresistible, and which must make itself manifest by continuous noise. 

Last year we had an interesting and highly successful series of games. 
As usual, the team began with an important ]iosition unfilled, — the question 
mark being over the catcher's place because of Byrd's resignation. Beauchamp 
loomed up from the Fourth Class, made good, and became one of our strongest 
men. Devault comj^leted his fourth year with flying colors, having the re- 
markable honor of pitching practically every game during his cadetship. Age 
only seemed to improve the pitching qualities of the sturdy "Charlie Dee,'' 
and there was no little sadness when he made his last delivery on the V. M. I. 
diamond. The graduation of '08 took from us Doyle, Massie, and Donnan; 
also all of whom were monogram men of two years, leaving vacant second base, 
first base, and right field. Pollock, '0'.), made his UKinogram for the fourth 
year, holding down center in his iuconiparalile way. Although elected cajitain 
of the team for 1 !)()!• season, he did not rctui'ii. 

As for those left, Grammer "picked 'cm up" at short for the third year, 
and showed a marked improvement at the bat. Scott always had some sur]u-ises 
in base running, and was never found wanting in left field. Young made his 
first monogram at third. 

The two games of the season to be remciiilx'rt'd were the ^'. P. L game 
at Roanoke, and that with the Pniversity nf West Virginia on onr grounds. 
In the former, with a tie score in the tenth inning, P)canchamp made a long- 
drive over left field, bringinii' in the three men mi bases, and liave us a vietorv 



of 9 to 6. The West Virginians, fresh from a glorious list of thirteen victories, 
met their first defeat from onr hands with a score of 4 to 2. Out of a season 
of eleven games, fortune favored us with eight victories. 

Grannuer was elected captain to succeed Pollock, and the season opens 
under favorable auspices. Krebs, who has successfully coached the team for 
three years, is still the energetic taskmaster. Walton, '12, and Robertson, '10, 
offer likely candidates for pitcher, and ths Fourth Class gives jiromise of excel- 
lent material to fill the blank positions. Moore, C, and Chapman show up 
especially well, and from a s(pu;d of sixty or more men, "good pickings" should 
be had. 

The schedule is as follows : 

;\Iiiroli 27 — Fishburn JI. S. at Lexington 

April 3 — Hanipden-Sidney at Lexington 

April 8 — St. John's College at Lexington 

April 10 — Roanoke College at Lexington 

April 12— V. P. I. at Roanoke 

April IT — Rieliniond College at Lexington 

April 24 — Open 

April 80 — Davidt^on at Lexington 

iL\y 8 — Ojien 

^[av 12 — ililliuan College at Lexington 



IBase&all Ceam 



OFFICERS 

McMlLLEN Manager 

HODGE Assistant Manager 

TEAM 

BEAUCHA3IP Catcher 

BENTLEY ) „. , 

WALTON I ^'*'^'^^^" 

Maclean First Base 

MOOEE Second Base 

CHAPMAN Third Base 

GEAMMER Shortstop 

GATES Left Field 

SCOTT Center Field 

JENKINS Right Field 

STJBS 

YOUNG BARNES 

GROVE OWEN 

JONES ]!RYAX 




MCJIILLEX. IIG 




GRAii:\IEK. Capt.^ '00 




Uou.^E. Ass'T Mgk. 




Early Baseball Practice 




TAMPI'S SCENE! 



IBasket^OBall Ceam 



OFFICERS 

PORTER, H. J Captain 

OWSLEY Manager 

BROWN, C Assistant Manager 

KREBS Coach 

LINE TTP 

JIcENTEE rt'Slit Forward 

PORTER. H. J I-''" Forward 

BURACKER ^'S^'^ Guard 

VENABLE Left Guard 

PATTISON I Centers 

MECREDY I 

SUBSTITUTES 

CROCKETT MacRAE 

KELLY ADAMS, F. W. 




OWSLEYj MGE. 




roiiTKi:. Cai't.. '00 




r.iiowN C, Ass'T Mc:r. 



[Basket-Ball 



FOR many years we have felt the need of some sjjort to fill np the vacant 
time between the football and the baseball seasons. Heretofore this interim 
of two months and a half, from last of November to the middle of February, 
has been one of stagnation in athletic lines. But this year a great change, with 
well-deserved success, has taken place. During the past winter V. M. I. was 
represented by a basket-ball team for the first time. 

The basket-ball team was organized the last part of ITo^'ember, through 
the efforts of Captain Corse. Porter, '09, was chosen captain, with Owsley, '09, 
as manager, and Brown, '10, as assistant manager. Pat Krebs, our baseball 
coach for the past three years, was obtained as coach. Our team this year was 
as snccessfid as we could expect. Some of the men were new at the game, and 
the others had not played for periods ranging from one to four years. In all 
the contests our men were in the game from start to finish. A jirettier game 
was never played than that against Central Y. M. C. A., of Baltimore, on Jan- 
uary twenty-third. At the end of the first half the score stood 10 to 10, and 
when time was called at end of second half the score was again a tie, i^3 to 2:^). 
They agreed to play until one team shoTild score two points, which the 
Y. M. C. A. Team did on a long throw, after several minutes of extra play. The 
games with Virginia, George Washington, Staunton Military Academy, and 
Randolph-Macon were all good games, although it nmst be said that in the 
Virginia game the team did not show much aggressiveness. 

Of the individual playing of the men, little need be said, but special men- 
tion should go to McEntee, whose good throwing, both from field and from fouls, 
was excellent. Porter, Pattison, Buracker, Venable, and McCredy, also did 
good work throughout the season. The schedule this year was not so long as it 
will probably be in the future. The team this year was somewhat in the nature 
of an experiment, but it has stood the test well. We will lose only two men 
this year by graduation, and next year ought to see a first-class team. There 
can be no doubt but that basket-ball has come to stay, and that hereafter it will 
take its place in V. M. T. athletics along with baseball and football. 




Barracks and Camp 



GimASiun. 




Gym Team 



ATHLETICS at the Institute, like at other first-class military schools, is 
gi-eatly handicapi^ed for the lack of time ; however, many men turn 
out for the different branches each year, and by taking advantage of 
every spare moment, become very efficient. This is especially true of g}anna- 
sium work, as they have the entire year to work, instead of a few months, like 
baseball, basket-ball, etc. 

We are very proud of the showing made last finals, for it was far above 
the average, and some dift'erent from the usual exhibition. It consisted of indi- 
vidual and team work on the dift'erent apparatus, with a few sparring and 
wrestling matches to liven things up. Adams, I., captain of the team, was by 
far the star; however, notwithstanding that, Doyle, Alexander, Richardson, 
Hobson, Jones, Britton, Buracker, and Adams, O., showed much skill, and 
deserve much praise. 

Prospects this year look doubly l)right, as we have Captain Doyle — who 
was awarded the Williamson-Graham Cup last year, being the best all-round 
athlete in school — as instructor, and Alexander as caj^tain. The old men back 
are Alexander, Richardson, Jones, Hobson, Britton, McMillen, Buracker, 
Adams, 0., Johnson, F., and Mahone. These, with a few new aspirants, will 
no doubt make a name for themselves in the final display. 

It is hoped that in the near future we will be allowed to have gym contests 
with other college teams, as we do in other branches of athletics, for it will be 
more of an inducement, instead of a mere love for the sport, to make the men 
work for the team, and if trips could be secured, greater interest than ever 
would no doubt be manifested. 

With great enthusiasm Ave look forward for the time when Ca]itaiu Hack 
will hold up the remainder of the team in a pyramid ; Richardson will do the 
triple back-flip; Jones, the "gigantic" swing with one hand, and Bu. with his 
nifty mat work, especially the hand-spring. So with all of this we wish them 
the best of success. 




IICC'LELLAXD, ilUlt. 




(}. M. Alexander, Capt. 



r i4iij "^^ ^ji^j> 




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Ljp^^^^' 


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p:=J 


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0pmnasium Ceam 



OFFICERS 

G. M. ALEXANDER Captain 

R. W. ilcCLELLAN Manager 

MEMBERS 

R1CHARD80X, J. T. 
JONES, L. L. 

BRIXTON. L. N. 
DO\A'NEY, B. J. 

HOBSON, J. W. 

BURACKER, E. il. 
ADAMS. H. 0. 

JOHNSON. F. L. 
MAHONE, il. T. 

KINGSOLVING. H. B. 
JACKSON. W. C. 

MILLNER. S. il., JR. 
BOWMAN, R. C. 



bearers of S^onograms 



ALEXANDER, '09 
MACLEAN, '10 
POAGUE, T., '09 
POAGUE, H., '10 
PORTER, H. J., "09 
SCOTT, '09 

McMILLEN, '09 



JUNTON, '09 
FERREBEE, '12 
PATTISON, '10 
DaVANT, E., '11 
De SHIELDS, '11 
CLEMMER, 'U 

JACOB, '09 (Manager) 



BASEBALL 

SCOTT, '09 
MASSIE, '08 
DONNAN, '08 
DOYLE, J., '08 
BEAUCHAMP, '12 
DeVAULT, '08 
YOUNG, '11 
GEAMMEE, '09 
MACLEAN, '10 
POLLOCK, '09 
WAED, G. B., '08 



GYMNASIUM 

ADAMS, I., '08 



^ong$ 



(TUKE: "Down Wliere the Wurzliei-gcr Flows.") 
Take it down by down, now Cadets, till yon ^^ in that goal. 
We are with you men, with all our hearts and soul. 
We love each who works for the dear Institute, 
So strive not for fame, but to uphold tlie name. 

And Glory of old V. M. I. 

(Tlne: "Chorus of Laid Away a Suit of Gray.") 
Old V. M. I. is out to die or win where'er she goes. 

She'll forge her way at every play towards the goal-pose of her foes; 
She'll show her grit and never quit till in the dust she lies, 
She will show them all how to play football. 
Now, "Hike it, V. M. I." 

(TuNE: "Long-Meter Doxology.") 
Red, white and yellow floats on high; 
The Institute must never die. 
So, now Cadets, with one voice cry: 
God Bless our Team and V. M. I. 



gclls 



Rah, Rah, Rah! Vir-gin-ia! 

Military Institute! Rah, Rah, Rah! 
Rah, Hoo, Ri! Rah, Hoo, Ri! 

Ri! Ri! V. M. I.! 

Oski Wow Wow! Skinny \A'ow \\'ow! 
V. M. I., V. M. L, Wow! 

Hullabaloo! Rah! Rah! 
Hullabaloo! Rah! Rail! 
Who! Rah! Who! Rah! 
V. M. I. Rah! Rah! 

Riih! Rah! V. M. 1.! 

Rah! Rah! V. M. I.! 

Rah! Rah! V. M. I.! 

v.! M.! I.! 

Hoo-oo-oo-oo Rah ! Hoo-oo-oo-oo Rah ! 
V. M. I.! V. M. I.! V. M. I.! 



Citiil OBngincering Course 



INSTRUCTORS 

COL. JONES 
CAPT. MARSHALL (APT. ilECEEDY 

STUDENTS— FIRST CLASS 

ilcMILLlX. X. 

RICHARDSON, J. 

SMITH, W. C. DRAYTON 

TRISLER JAMES 

WAGNER MAYO 

WHITE, 0. MILLEN, R. 

ADAMS. F. POLK 

SARNES WHEELER 

ALEXANDER . GATES 

BRITTON KEEN 

CASKIE MAGRUDER 

STUDENTS— SECOND CLASS 

AKIN 

BALDINGER 

BENTLEY 

BLO\\' 

CAFFERY 

COULBOURN 

CROWSON 

ELLISON, A. 

GILLIAM 

JOHNSON, F. 

NICHOLS 

NOWLIN 

ORR 

PATTISON 

RHETT, R. 

RICHARDS 

ROBEKTSON 

SNIDOW 

TINSLEY 

WHITE, G. 

YANCEY 





^MAT TOOLS ThtSC nORTALS DE ! 




dBIemical dBngineering Course 





INSTRUCTORS 




COL. iL4LL0RY 




MAJ. POAGUE 




CAPT. MARSHALL 




STUDENTS— FIRST CLASS 


BRETT 


GANT 


BURACKEE 


SCOTT 


CROCKETT 


MINIS 


DOWNEY 


NOELL 


ELLISON 


RHETT, W. 




STUDENTS— SECOND CLASS 


BALL 


MURPHY 


BROWN, C. 


PAYNE 


DODSON 


POAGUE, H. 


EASTHAM, 


K. RANKIN 


HA3'INER 


STAPLES 


HODGE 


TAYLOR, A. 


KANE, H. 


THOMPSON, J. 


MACHALL 


WARD 



Cfeemisttp Course 



INSTRUCTORS 

COL. PENDLETON 
COL. TUCKER 

STUDENTS— FIRST CLASS 



DOYLE 


GEAMMEE HOBSON 




HAYES .JENKINS 


JACOB 


.JONES LINDSEY 




POETEB McCLELLAN 


POAGUE, T. 


MINTON OWSLEY' 




STUDENTS— SECOND CLASS 


ADAMS, 0. 


DENHAM MACLEAN 


JIAHONE WILSON, G. 




TALIAEEEEO WESTMOEELAND 



ITIi 




THE CADET 



VIRGINIA AnLITAKY INSTITUTE. JUNE 25, 1908 




IN spite of the small aiiunmt uf time allowed at the Institute for outside work of any 
kind, and especially for the quantity aiul ijuality of work required in editing a 
weekly newspaper, the cadets manage to get out a sheet which compares favorably 
with anything of the kind in the college world. The issues of 'Tlic Cadet contain 
all the news of barracks, such as accounts of athletic games, social events, and personal 
news, and such articles connected with alumni as will interest them. 

The Cadet was founded in liJ07 for tlie dual purpose of spreading abroad news 
of the V. M. I., and of keeping the alumni in touch with each other, and thus arousing 
and sustaining their interest in their alma mater. Both these objects have been accom- 
plished, and the paper has found favor with all classes. 

In barracks, ?7ic Catlct aims to discuss all questions of interest, and in every case 
it has taken the side of the right, a course which appeals to every cadet, past and 
present. In consequence its influence is already marked, and is on the increase. The 
value of its credit among the ex-cadets is instanced by the adoption of the plan for 
alumni support of athletics, which was first mentioned in its columns, and later kept 
alive by a series of editorials which finally resulted in its success. In other matters, 
too numerous to mention, it has exercised as conspicuous a sway. 

The Cadet's circulation is large, practically every man in barracks sub.seribing, 
and it reaches nearly ever}' alumnus aware of its existence. \Miatever funds remain 
in excess of the expense of publication are turned over to the conunittee on athletics, and 
in this way it accomplishes nuich for the Institute. That it is beneficial in other ways 
is admitted by all, and a continuation of its present policy assures a continuation of 
the benefits it has conferred. 

THE CADET STAFF 

G. M. ALEXANDER. '09 Editor-in-Chief 

T. S. PATTISON, '10 Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

T. M. SCOTT Business Manager 

CHIEF ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. M. RHETT J. M. MAGRUDER R. GANT 

A. M. OWSLEY B. D. MAYO R. F. WAGNER L. N. BRITTON 

ASSISTANT ASSOCIATE EDITOKS 

E. HODGE G. B. COULBOURN J. B. BENTLEY 



177 




THE Dramatic Club deserves tlie greatest praise and commendation for the high- 
class entertainment i;iven the cadets, and for their unselfish labor in behalf 
of the school annual. An entertainment of any kind is a welcome break in the 

dull routine of military and academic duties, while the proceeds of these enter- 
tainments have contributed materially to the financial side of the Bomb. 

The minstrel given on the night of the first Christmas hop was a huge success. 
The crowd was large, and every person in it was pleased. Messrs. Hull and Rankin 
were easily the stars, winning applause and encores by their clever singing and 
dancing, as in their presentation of Capt. John Smith and his lightning-drilled Red 
Huzzars. The song hits were "Down in Jungle Town." and "Going Back to the City," 
by the chorus. 

The vaudeville stunts and comic scenes were interesting and entertaining. Cadet 
Scott, as interlocutor, handled his men well. He was a moving spirit in the club from 
the start, and the success of the entertainments are due in no small part to his un- 
ceasing labor and attention. 

The Easter entertainment will also be in the shape of a minstrel and vaudeville, 
but with an entire change of costume and program. 

The Dramatic Club consists of the following cadets: 



CAilP 

CROWSON 

DALTON 

DRAYTON 

FIGGINS 

GUTHRIE 

HULL 

MARTIN 

JIcELROY 



j\1cC:LELLAND 

McMILLEN 

MORRISON, C:, 

OWSLEY 

RANKIN 

SCOTT 

STOCKS 

STUCKY 

WHITFIELD 



Cije CaDet Dialectic JLitetatp ^ocictp 



SCOTT President 

SAUNDERS Vice-President 

OQR one literary society has suffered more and greater vicissitudes than any 
similar organization, here or elsewliere, ever successfully survived. The term 
successfully is wrong; any term implying an object accomplished would be 
wrong, for the Cadet Dialectic Literary Society, owing to the lack of interest 
among the cadets, leads an existence precarious to a degree. 

Indeed, for a number of years it led no existence at all. and the would-be 
orators in barracks found no audiences for their eloquence. In 1907 several men who 
were oratorieally inclined reorganized it, and for some months on every Saturday 
night the society met in the Y. M. C. A. hall to discuss questions of interest, listen to 
orations in prose and verse, and to partake of the similar treats so liberally offered in 
everj' literary society. 

The fact that such an organization is of general benefit is conceded among the 
cadets, and its failure is more to be attributed to the lack of time than any other 
reason. It is to be hoped that next year this valuable adjunct to the course in 
literary work will be established on a foundation firm enough to assure its benefits 
to succeeding generations of cadets. 







"^^ 



A. M. OWSLEY President 

H. G. POAGUE Vice-President 

C. R. DAVANT Secretary 

H. W. SMITH Treasurer 



THAT branch of tlie Y. M. C. A. which has proved so useful a feature in other 
colleges is to be found in a flourishing condition at V. M. I. Here, as elsewhere, it 
extends a helping hand to the young man just embarking on life's voyage, and 

affords one of the most powerful influences for right living to be found in our 
country. 

The first branch to be founded in the State was at the University of Virginia, in 
the early eighties. Not until some years later was the work begun at the Institute, 
but since its foundation here it has enjoyed almost phenomenal success. Its membei'- 
ship and influence among the corps have been greatly increased, and its men carry away 
with them after graduation the lessons they have learned within its fold. 

Meetings are held weekly, and often two or more take place in that time. Fre- 
quent opportunity is thus given its members to hear the Lexington ministers, and 
arrangements are frequently made with speakers of wider reputation to come here to 
address the cadets. 

Usuallj', delegates are sent to conventions when these are held in cities near 
enough to warrant the trip. As none such have been held this year, an interesting 
feature of the work has perforce been eliminated. Interest in the work of the Associ- 
ation is widespread in barracks, and speaks well for the religious inclinations of the 
cadets. Under the efficient officers chosen for next year there is every prospect that this 
work will be continued. 



Q^anDoIin CIu6 



VIOLINS 

CAMP 



r.OWMAN 

BLOW 



MANDOLINS 

ROBERTSON DRAYTON 

DODD McCLELLAN, R. 



NOVVLIJN 
BRITTON 



DAVANT, E. 



GUITARS 

MAHONE 



WHITE, O. 



FLUTE 

BOUGHTON 



CLARIONET 

CROCKETT 



Clje press CIul) 



G. MURKELL ALEXANDER President 

T. S. PATTISON Secretary 

THROUGH the efforts of Captain Corse, of Lexington, thei'e was or- 
ganized on February 6, 1009, the V. M. L Press Club, the object 
of which is to keep the Institute continually in the public eye by 
sending frequent articles to the daily papers in all nearby cities. 
To Captain Corse, assisted by Captain Edwards, the club is indebted 
for the system which makes its work possible. The articles are written 
in barracks by the members, and range in subject from accounts of our 
baseball and football games, to accounts of our social affairs. A special 
feature is made of news of the military department, and copy dealing 
with this has found especial favor with the public. The articles when 
written, are either mailed or telegraphed, accoi'ding to their importance. 
In this part of the routine a certain amount of expense is inevitable; this 
Is defrayed by the Institute, through the generosity of General Nichols. 
Practically since the date of its organization the work of the club has 
been appearing regularly in the press of Lynchburg. Roanoke, Richmond, 
Norfolk, Newport News, and Baltimore, and articles of general interest are 
sent farther abroad. It has met with the heartj- cooperation of all, and has 
come to stay. 

The members are, honorary: Captain SI, B. Corse, Captain JIurray F. 
Edwards. Active: ilessrs. Alexander, Owsley, JIagruder, Rhett, Bentley, 
Pattison, and Mecredy. 




Pcnaltp Courists 



MAHONE 
NOELL 

ADAMS, O. 
MACLEAN 
EASTHAM, R. 
DAVENPORT 
ADAilS. F. 
DILLARD, A. 
MINTON 
CROCKETT 
.AIACKALL 
ADAMS, W. 
RANKIN 
MURPHY 
MOSELEY 
HAGENBUCH 
GANT, E. 
LTNDSEY 
HO\^ARD 



185 



Cotillion eiut) 



DRAYTON, C. H President 

JIAGRUDER, J Vice-President 

ADAMS JACOB 

ALEXANDER JAMES 

BARNES JENKINS 

BRETT , JONES 

BRITTON LINDSEY 

BURACKER McCLELLAN 

CASKIE MAGRUDER 

CROCKETT NOELL 

DOWNEY OWSLEY 

DOYLE POLK 

DRAYTON PORTER 

GANT RHETT 

GATES RICHARDSON 

GRAMilER SCOTT 

HAYES SINCLAIR 

HOBSON WAGNER 



Final Week 



THE time toward which the cadet looks eagerly for ton long weary months, 
the climax of a _year's hard work, is Final Week. It brings gifts for all — 

for the First Class the end of Institute life and the entrance into a broader 
existence ; for the Second Class the beginning of a year at the head of the 
Y. M. I. ; to the Third Class the relinquishing of the questionable privileges it 
is their right to enjoy ; and to the rats the happy ending of a year the like of 
which they never have passed and never will pass again. 

i^ature herself makes an extra eifort to make the occasion a glorioiis one ; 
the month, which always calls to mind smiling skies and gentle breezes, oifers 
its best for Final Week, as if donning its choicest garb in honor of the 
graduates. Quiet Lexington assumes an unwonted gayety. Its streets are 
thronged with visitors, friends and relatives of the cadets, who line the avenues 
about the parade ground from guard mounting until taps. The pleasant hours 
of the early evening are filled with merry gossip here and there, for this is the 
only time of day the men have to themselves. 

Academic work is a thing of the past, reviews and classes long since over, 
and all the energies of the cadets are bent toward entertaining their visitors. 
Military duties occupy every hour of the day, as the work of the entire year 
is gone over in one week. Company and battalion drills, Butts' ilannal and 
bayonet exercise, with the host of exercises and drills with which we become 
familiar, follow each other in rapid succession, the men being stimulated to 
their best efforts by the applause from the fair visitors. A very realistic sham 
battle takes place toward the close of the week ; one company being detailed 
to defend the plateau on which the parade ground is located, while the others 
compose the assaulting party. Another feature of the week, one which gives an 
insight to the under current of sadness beneath the gayety of the season, is the 
graduation parade, when the first classmen review the cadets of the lower 
classes at the last parade. 

In the evening the gymnasium is transformed into a ballroom, and its 
grim stone walls look down benevolently on the gay throng of dancers whirling 
on its polished floors. The most notable social events are the Final German 
and the Final Ball, the former given by the first classmen, the latter to the 



graduates by the Second Class. The Final Ball is the closing affair, and the 
gray and gold uniforms and nodding plumes of the marshals in the figiires add 
a touch charming to all who have ever witnessed the spectacle. 

The last scene of the week is enacted on the little railroad station in 
Lexington, and is affecting to those who see beneath the exterior of light 
heartedness. There the last good-byes are said by the graduates, many of whom 
will never again clasp the hand of beloved classmates with whom four happy 
years were spent. But all this sentiment, however deeply felt, is kept under 
the surface. The Calic wave farewell from the coach windows, the cadets, in 
all the unaccustomed glory of cits, shake hands again and again. The last of 
them finally board their train, and another Final Week has passed into history, 
to be a topic whenever V. M. I. men meet to discuss old times. 

FINAL CELEBRATIONS 

.June 18 Opening Hop 

.June 19 Gymnasium Exhibit 

June 20 Baccalaureate Sermon 

June 21 Final German 

June 22 Society Hop — Alumni ; Smoker 

June 23 Final Ball 



Jfinal (German 



CHAS. H. DRAYTON, JR Leader 

JOHN MAGRUDER Assistant Leader 

MARSHALS 

ADAilS JENKINS 

ALEXANDER LINDSEY 

BARNES McCLELLAN 

BRETT McMILLEN 

BRITTON MAYO 

BURACKER NOELL 

CASKIE OWSLEY 

CROCKETT POLK 

DOWNEY PORTER 

DOYLE RHETT 

GANT RICHARDSON 

GRAMMER SCOTT 

HAYES SINCLAIR 

HOBSON SMITH 

JACOB WAGNER 

JAMES WHITE 




' — V*^ <LA^ Csh.,ja£^ 'f -J 



FINAL BALL 1999 



9iar0f)als' JFinal IBall 



HODGE Leader 

RAXKIN , . .Assistant Leader 



BOWE 

JOHNSON, F. 
HAMNER 

WILSON. G. 
AKIN 

BALL. E. 
laiEPHY 
YANCEY 

EASTHAM, K. 
DODSON 
ENGLISH 
BROWN, C. 
PATTISON 
BENTLEY 

BALDINGER 
ADAilS. O. 
KANE 

TALIAFERRO 
MACLEAN 
MACALL 
■ NICHOLS 

TINSLEY 
WHITE, G. 
PAYNE 
GILLIAJI 
ilAHONE 
BLO^-^' 

KINS0LV1N(; 
CAFFERY 
CROWSON 

104 



a Letter 



K-M. W. C. 
Mk. E. Z. Maek— 

My Dear Mr. Mark: It would be impossible for me to say how much we appreciate your 
many courtesies extended us while in Lexington. All of the girls say V. M. I. is the greatest 
place they ever saw, and are looking forward to another trip. 

The man who was "Day Officer" was exceedingl}' nice to us. I don't remember his name, 
but some of the cadets called him Mr. 0. D., and others called him Mr. Hack. I suppose the 
latter is his name. 

You were so nice to invite Miss Pickle to the next hop, and I hope it is not asking too 
much of you to invite Miss Onion, also. She is one of the sweetest and dearest girls in 
school, and a perfect dancer. This is her last year in Virginia, and I feel that she is missing 
such a treat in staying away from V. JI. I. 

Hoping I am not inconveniencing you in any way, and again thanking yen for your many 
kindnesses, I remain, 

Cordially yours. 

May Catchem. 

Lynchburg, Va., Feb. 12. 

Oh! I forgot: all of us wish to be remembered to Mr. Hack. 



Ci)e JRepIp 



V. M. I., Lexington, Va., Feb. 15, 1909. 

My Deak Miss Catchem : Cadets are always glad to receive letters from R.-M. \V. C, 
so imagine my delight when your epistle was given me just a few minutes ago. 

So far, all of my efforts have been in vain in trying to get a partner for Miss Onion. 
1 now have the entire First Class using all their persuasive efforts to secure her an escort. 
One of the cadets just told me that Mr. Caret, a "Rat," who is in the hospital, wants a "calie" 
for the dance, and thinks he will take Miss Onion. 

The cadet you called "Jlr. Hack" is a Lynchburg bo}', and has asked to have .your com- 
pany for the second hop. He is very handsome, and the strongest man in school. I have 
spoken to Mr. Beware about taking Miss Pickle, but he is confined to his room for the rest of 
the j'ear. Mr. Gotstung, who is considered the best dancer in school, leaves on an indefinite 
furlough a few days before the hop. 

I shall write you more definitely after drill. Please give my regards to all your friends. 

Very cordially, 

E. Z. Mark. 



V. M. I. Biography 



To ALL "Old Cadets" — Greeting : 

CoMEADEs: Under the above title (or its equivalent), the undersigned 
purposes, with your assistance and that of other kind friends and patriots, to 
compile and publish an Epitomized History of all who have ever been Cadets at 
the V. M. I. 

There have been approximately five thousand and five hundred "Matricu- 
lates," of whom, it is believed, one-fifth at least have lioen summoned to the 
final "Roll-Call," over two hundred haring been killed in battle or died in 
Military Service. 

The object in view is two-fold : First, to rescue from oblivion the names 
and deeds of all the sons of our alma mater, and, secondly, to bring the living 
sons in closer touch with one another and with the Old Mother. 

To this end, all living Ex-Cadets are affectionately urged to send their 
records, without delay, to the undersigned, the same to contain not over fiv? 
hundred words each, under the general headings given below, and they are 
earnestly invoked to lend their aid then in securing from the families and 
descendants of all deceased "Old Cadets" the data necessai-y to compile thsir 
records. 

The undersigned indulges the hope ( it may be only a dream ^ that this 
proposed historical work will redound to the benefit of our alma mater, and to 
her sons, in another way. When all the "records" are in hand they will be 
edited and published in several volumes, and the xvorh then offered for sale. 
The income from the sale (if any) will be devoted to forming the nucleus of 
a fimd to be used in erecting, on the groimd of the V. ]\r. I., an ALUiixi Hall 
(with commodious accommodations for quartering the hundreds of "Old 
Cadets" who attend the periodical "Reunions"), to be dedicated to the memory 
of all the Graduates and Eleves of the Virginia Military Institute ivho gave 
their lives for their country. 

The following data are specially wanted : 

1. Full name (all names ivritten out). 

2. Names of parents (and grandparents, on both sides, when practicable), 
and place of birth of each. 

3. Residence of parents at time of matriculation. 

4. Place and date of birth of matriculate. 

5. Period of cadetship (approximately). 

197 



6. If a student at any other institution of learning, give degree or other 
distinction obtained (if any). 

7. Occupation, or i^rofession, before the war of 1S61. 

8. Full maiden name of wife and her father's name and his residence, 
and year of marriage, Avith issue thereof (names). 

9. *Wae Record: embracing — 



'Applicable to Mexican War and Spanish War as well. 

(a) Command (or successive commands). 

(b) Rank. 

(c) If killed or wounded, state in what battle or engagement. 

(fZ) If a prisoner, state when and where captured, and where and how 
long in prison. 

10. Occupation, or profession, after the war of 1861. 

11. Rotable achievements, honors, or distinctions (military, literary, 
scientific, ecclesiastical, or 2)olitical). 

12. Interesting incidents in career not falling under above heads. 

13. Present (permanent) post-offic? address, if living; or if deceased, date 
and place of death. 

Yours in "Auld Lang Syne," 

Joseph R. Anderson. 
Lee, Goochland CoTinty, Virginia, 
January 1, 1909. 

endorsement 

Virginia Militabt Institute, 
Lexington, Va., December 9, 1903. 
To Whom it may Concern: 

Joseph R. Anderson, of Virginia, a graduate of the Class of 1870, a most enthusiastic, 
devoted, efficient and helpful Alumnus, is engaged in the preparation of a History of all the 
Matriculates of tlie Virginia Military Institute. This is an interesting work, and one of 
great labor, and it is heartily endorsed and favorabl;;- commended to all to whom Sfr. 
Anderson may apply fcr information and assistance. 

Very respectfully. 

Scott Shipp, Superintendent. 



Headquarters, Virginia Military iNsriTUTE, 

December 2, 1908. 
I not only cordially endorse Captain Anderson, but most heartily commend the work 
of love in which he is engaged to our Alumni. All Ex-Cadets who have not done so should 
write to him at once. 

E. \\'. Nichols, Superintendent. 




X'KSTKV OK THE EPI.SO.PAI. CHURCH CLUD 



13. 9@. 3. alumni associations 



Petersburg, Va. 

Carter E. Bishop, President 

il. C. Jackson, Vice-President 

W. L. Zimnier, Jr., Secretarj'-Treasurer 

Norfolk, Va. 

Col. George W. Taylor. President 
Capt. P. E. Yeatnian, Vice-President 
Capt. J. S. Jenkins, Treasurer 
Branch Johnson. Secretary 

Newport-Xews-Hamptok 

Col. J. H. Ham, President 

Hon. W. E. Barrett, Vice-President 

E. I. ilason. Secretary (Hampton, Va.) 

Lynchburg, Va. 

E. W. ilassie, President 
H. L. Slianer, Secretary 



ElCHMOND, Va. 

Dr. J. X. Upshur, President 
Gen. C. J. Anderson, 1st Vice-President 
Capt. George Ainslie, 2nd Vice-Presidenr 
Maj. B. B. Morgan. Secretary-Treasurer 

Baltimore, ^1d. 

Mr. Eandolph Barton. President 
Dr. W. D. Scott, Vice-President 
Mr. Montague Blundon, Secretary 

New York City. 

Hon. J. S. Wise. President 
Mr. J. C. ileem. Secretary 

L'osTON Tech. 

W. T. Biedler. President 

H. C. Schmidt. Vice-President 

J. T. Jlalone, Jr.. Secretary and Treasurer 



IRccapitulation 



Virginia 144 

Texas 31 

Georgia 17 

Maryland 17 

Alabama 14 

Missouri 14 

New York 14 

District of Cohurl)ia 11 

Kentucky 10 

Mississippi 10 

North Carolina 10 

\\'est Virginia 8 

Louisiana 7 

Ohio 7 

Tennessee 7 

Arkansas 5 

South C'ariilini 5 



l'( nnsylyaiiia 

I-Cansas 

ilpssacliusetts 
California 
Colorado . . . 

Cuba 

Florida 

Illinois 

Indiana . . . . 

Jlichigan . . 

Oklalioma 

Philippines 

Washington 

Wisconsin 



Total 334 



^cknotuleDgments: 



The Bomb StaflF dfesire to express their appreciation and 
sincere thanks to the following persons: Miss Couper, of 
Montelair, N. J.; ilr. Fickes, of Dunbar, Pa.; Mr. McCoy, ol 
Kansas City, :Mo.; ilr. Wagstafl', of Atlanta, Ga.; Cadets 
Britton and Colbourne. for drawings; and C4en. Shipp, Dr. 
Upshur, of Richmond, Va.; Mr. Joe Garnett, of Washington, 
D. C, and Cadet Pattison. for articles. 




Cadets will remember to 
"Patronize those who patronize us.' 






VIRGINIA 
MILITARY 
INSTITUTE 

S E I' E N TY~ F I R S T YEAR 



n 



ONE OF THE FEW, IF NOT THE 
ONLY INSTITUTION IN THE 
UNITED STATES, COMBINING 
THE RIGID MILITARY SYSTEM OF THE 
UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY 
WITH COLLEGIATE AND TECHNICAL 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

E. W. NICHOLS, SUPERIXTENDEXT 
LEXINGTON, V I R G I N I A 



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4 



CHARLOTTESVILLE 
WOOLEN MILLS 

Charlottesville, Virginia 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

High Grade Uniform Cloth 

For Army, Navy, Police and Rail- 
road purposes, and the Largest 
Assortment and Best 
Quality of 

Cadet Grays 



t -i' 



Including those used at 


the 


United 


States 


Military Academy, 


West Point, 


and 


other lead- 


ing military schoo 


s of the 


country 


. £ 


9i 


£ 


Used exclusively 


in uniforms 


of 


Cad 


ets 


of 


Virginia Military 


Institute. 


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2 


i 


S. 


5. 



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I Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. | 




Hi^NDSOME VESTIBULED TRi^INS 

Of Day Coaches, Pullman Sleepers, Dining Cars and Observation Par- 
lor Cars of the latest pattern between New York, Baltimore, Phila- 
delphia, Washington, Old Point Comfort, Richmond, Virginia Hot 
Springs, Cincinnati, Louisville, St. Louis, Chicago. 

Direct Connkction for Lextngton, Va. Throug)i the most piciuresque and historic 
rec;ions of America. Mountains, Rivers, Canons, Battle-fi Ids, Colonial Landmarks, 
Health and Pleasure Resorts and Summer Homes in High Altitudes. 

For illustTated, desciiptioe pamphlets, address 

JOHN D. POTTS, General Passenger AgL, RICHMOND, VA. 









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W. E. GRANGER 



PROPFSIETOR 




Billiard and Pool Parlors 

Cigars 

Cigarettes and 

Tobaccos 

(DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED) 

BARBER SHOP ATTACHED 

Headquarters 

For Cadets on Saturday 

Afternoons 

The Only Second-class Billiard Parlors in Athens 

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITEID 

"ESSE QUAM VIDERl MALUM- 

Jefferson and Washington Sts., Lexington, Va. 







^♦^*'M**!*<-^*^*^*^*^-^**M-J~I-J**J*^~M^~s-M*4*^ 



CADETS ALL GO TO 

For TOILET ARTICLES, DRUGS, 
FINE STATIONERY, HUYLER'S 
CANDIES, TOBACCO, CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES. Sundries, all kinds 



McCrum's Soda Fountain is a perfectly 
equipped, new, modern outfit ; the 
materials used the best that can be 
obtained; the drinks turned out the 
most delightful and palatable to be 
found anywhere. Si £ £ £ 5; 



HrQIrum irug (En. 



! 



^. . . . .Vl-W, . i-^-V 



p. D. CAMP 
J. L. CAMP 



R. J. CAMP 



4- 



\LL AGREEMENTS SUBJECT TO STRIKES, ACCIDENTS, 

DELAYS BY CARRIERS OR OTHER DELAYS 

UNAVOIDABLE OR BEYOND 

OUR CONTROL 



Cable Address ; "CAMP FRANKLIN" 



CODES 

C. 5TH EDITION, TELECODE 




Manufacturing 
Company 

FRANKLIN, VIRGINIA 



BRANCH OFFICES: 

No. I Madison Avenue 

NEW YORK 

Geo. \V. Jones, Mgr. 

Frick Building 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

J. D. HOLLIHAN, Mcr. 



MILLS: 

FRANKLIN, VA. 

ARRINGDALE, VA. 

BUTTERWORTH 
VA. 



^manufacturers of = 



Kiln -Dried 

North Carolina 

PINE 

Rough and Dressed 



DAILY CAPACITY: 
Saw MOls, 350,000 Planing MQls, 200,C 



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MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT THE 

Eexington 33ool Compang*s 

NEWEST AND NICEST 

i^ool anti 3BUliarti 
i^arlors 



• • • 



\J^E have opened a Restaurant in connection 

with our parlors and solicit the Cadets' trade. 

Prompt and courteous attention. Meals served 

on short notice and at all hours. S. ^ S. S. 



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T. C. CONLON 



A. Z. SEIDERS 



C. €. Conlon $ Co. 

(Charlottesville, Uirdini<i 



Tail 



ors 



'Uhe 



College Man's Tailors 



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i 

Adams | 

Bros.-Paynes I 

Co. I 

"'Uhe Building Material People " 



DEALERS IN 

LUMBER OF ALL KINDS 

AND FOR ALL PURPOSES 

Sash, Doors and 
Blinds 



BRICKS, LIME AND CEMENT 



Lynchburg, Virginia 



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All Mair^in Rifles have tlie famous T^at/tn Breechbolt, 

which keeps out the rain and snow, twigs, sand, leaves, etc., 

which are apt to put the working parts of a lifle out of 

business. The 2flai/in is always to be depended upon. 

^ The 2^r///t ejection is at the side, so the empty shells 

' cannot possibly be thrown in the shooter's face at a cri;i- 

cal moment. The S2ar//n structure throughout is of 

ror.jesi and most enduring quality. 7P^ae/i/i accuracy is famous. A T^r/in 

. 2Sar/rn Rifles are the kind that big game hunters are trusting their li^ 

to every day. 

The Model 1893 2f2ar/in have "Special Smokless Steel" barrels, using powerful 
5 loads. The .32-40 and .38-55 are also made with the highest grade of soft, steel 
barrels for black powder. Better bags and eternal satisfaction are yours if you use a 7^Zar///2. 
Thev class by themselves. 

Write to-day for real stories of 2flar/in prowess in our Elxperience Book, and the new 
Catalog. Free to any address for 6 cents postage. 

^e 7/Iar///z .^rearms Co.Mwmowst..i^e^Haven,Conn. 

1^ 




KILLS RUST 
r: IE 2P7tzt/in RUST REPEL- 

LER IS the best preventative made, 
because it does not gum or drip, and 
hcjt. cold or salt water don't affect 
il. Rust repeller sticks, no matter 
how hot the firing. Get it of your 
dealer. Sample 1 'j oz. tubes sent 
postpaid for 1 5 cents. 



Model 1393. 38-55 

26-in., li Octagon, 

magazine. Take Down extra 

selected and checked. Pistol grip 

rubber bull. Special " D design checking 

Engraving No- 40 gold or platinum inlay Catalog 

list price $210.23. ^^ze/in Model 93 Repeating 

Rifles from $12.95. Catalog prices. Less at your de; 



>"--^»*5«5«-I**j«j**v***********I*****I**** 






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Just a Few 
Hours and You are There 

You travel a few pleasant hours on the Frisco, 
from St. Louis over the beautiful Ozarks, to 
Oklahoma and Texas. 

You ride in Frisco trains that have handsome 
newr equipment, modern in every particular. 

You eat Fred Harvey meals that are the finest 
you ever put into your mouth. 

You are thoroughly satisfied w^ith your trip 
and you resolve to always use the FRISCO 
when you can. 

Direct Connection made at St. Louis with trains from the East 

Five Through Trains Daily to the 

SOUTHWEST 

ALEX. HILTON, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 



vt.,.^,.Joo5..$..J«r.♦♦*♦;*♦♦*♦J«t.♦J*♦r.♦J^J«J«;„J,*J«♦^J*.r«♦«J«•^.,t.♦J.^J.,r,..t^, 



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PUBLISHERS 
PRINTERS 
BINDERS'" 
MANUFACTURING STATIONERS 



i,viFa@(ni ©(y iR@9^^o 





THrs 






ANNUA 


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WAS PR1^ 


ITEI 


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J D Bour 


■ID 


OUR 


ESTABLI 


SHr 


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IE ENGRAVIN 


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FUI 




NISHED 


BY 



J. p. BELL COMPANY 
LYNCHBURO, VIROINIA 



Guano, Salt, Cement, Lime, Grass Seed and the celebrated 1 
Vista Land Plaster always in stock ± 



Fray & Company 

Culpeper, Virginia 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Wheat, Corn, Rye, Oats 
Hay, Wool, Etc. 



X Terms : Net Cash 



Corner of East and Davis Streets 



N. W. CALCUTT, Pres. 

H. C. CALCUTT, Sec. & Treas. 

The N. W. Calcutt Co., Inc. 

Successors to N. W. Calcutt & Sons and 
The Dyersburg Stave and Heading Co. 



Manufacturers and dealers in 

Lumber, Staves 
and Heading 



^ 



Head Office: 

Dyersburg, Tennessee 



Marble Novelties 

Pedestals, Tables, 
Card Receivers, 
Paper Weights 

Georgia and 
North Carolina 
Marble 



The Georgia 
Marble Finishing Works | 

Canton, Georgia J 






ESTABLISHKE 1851 



F. J. HEIDBERGER 



Caiior 



535 FIFTEENTH ST., OPP. U. S. TREASURY 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



A. T. Higginbotham 



Wholesale 

Fruits and 
Produce 



L. D. PHONE 7T4 



X 110 AND 112 SOUTH AUGUSTA STREET 
I STAUNTON, VlRaNIA 



Greenlee D. Letcher 

Attornrg-at-ICatu 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



Offers for practice in all 

State and Federal 

Courts 



Stenographer and Notary Public 
in Office 



LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 



' *■,'• *,* *. '^,* \'"#**V**.'**^**.**.**.**.**«'".**»'"»'*%*'**^'**i'**»**»**»*****i'* 









— F. M. I. — 
Pressing Shop 

Room No. lo C^ Barracks 

Good Work Sluick Service 
Right Prices 



J. D. Eldridge Minor Greqoky 

President Vice-President 

R. T. Harvili.e, Sec. and Tjeas. 


THE 

HUGER- DAVIDSON -SALE 




COMPANY 


E. H. Conner Mercantile Co. 


WHOLESALE GROCERS 


\ GENERAL MERCHANTS 


LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 


COTTON FACTORS 


JAS, M. DAVIDSON, President 


: GRAYS, ARKANSAS 


BENJ. HUGER, General Manager 


\ ^ 


Direaors 

Jas. M. Davidson Benj. Huger 
Wm. A. Davidson E. A. Sale 
M. B. Corse M. D. Campbell 


\ Shipping Point : Grays, Ark. 
\ Main Office : Augusta, Ark. 


Incorporated under the laws of the 
State of Virginia 









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Mary Baldwin Seminary 



For Young Ladies 



STAUNTON, VIRGINIA 



'^erm begins September 9th. 1909 

Loca-ed in the Shenandjah Valley of Virginia Unsurpassed climate, 

beautiful grounds and modern appointments 295 students 

past session from 32 States. Pupils enter any 

time. Send for catalogue. 



MISS E. C. WEIMER, Principal 



J. C. MEEM 

M. AM. SOC. C. E. 

Civil 
Engineer 



Brooklyn, New York 



The MOIer Supply 
Company 

Supplies, '^ools and 

Machinery 



FOR MINES. MILLS 

CONTRACTORS 

RAILROADS 

Portland Cement 

Our larpe illustrated catalogue 

No. 2 sent to responsible 

parties on request 

Huntington and Bluefield, W. Va. 



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H. M. Thompson & Co. 
^ LIVERY 

DIRECTLY IN REAR OF LEXINGTON HOTEL I 

Phone No. bl 

Cadets' Patronage Solicited 



Friends of V. M. I. will greatly 
add to their personal appear- 
ance by patronizing the 

Lexington 
Steam Laundry 

GOOD WORK 

AND 

PROMPT DELIVERY 
GUARANTEED 

W. R. BEETON, Proprietor 
PHONE 170 



The same yesterday, to-day and 
to-morrow 



H. O. DOLD 



Who needs no advertising 



The boys come and the boys ^ 

go, the stores come and S 

the stores go, but X 

Dold goes on J 



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I STRAIN & PATTON 



€lotbier$ and Gents' 
?urni$bm 



OPPOSITE LEXINGTON HOTEL 
LEXINGTON, VA. 



STAUNTON 



ROANOKE 



The CALDWELL-SITES CO. 

FOUR BIG STORES 

SoDkapIlrrH, g>tattnttprB 

lEngraurra, Prtntrrs 

anh ^ublialjrrs 



COLLEGE PENNANTS, POSTERS 
ART GOODS AND CURIOS 

College jJnnuals a Specially 

Let Us Estimate on Your Next 
Mail Orders Solicited 



BRISTOL 



SALEM 



The Chas. H. EHiott Co. 

The Largest College Engraving House 

in the World 

Comm ncemenl Invitations, Class Day 

Programs and Class Pins 




Fraternity 
and Class 
Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 

WORKS : 17TH STREET AND LEHIGH AVENUE 

PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 



Fraternity X 



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.VV^A-%-' 









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HEADQUARTERS FOR V. M. I. BOYS 



QUISENBERRY & COMPANY 



CONFECTIONERIES, 
ICE CREAM, SODA 
WATER, TOBACCOS, 
FRUITS, NEWSPAPERS 
AND PERIODICALS 




W. T. SH I ELDS 
attorncp^at^Hato 



LEXl N GXO N 



VI RQ 1 N 1 A 



Koones & Harrison 



) C. M. Koones & Bri 



DEALERS IN 



FURNITURE, BEDDING 

RUGS, SHADES 

ETC. 



Our Undertaking 
Department is in 
charge of a regis- 
tered embalmer 



NELSON AND JEFFERSON STREETS 
LEXINGTON, VA. 



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•?• 



J. ED. DEAVER 

Clothing, Hats, Shoes and 
Gents' Furnishings 



Suits Made to Order 



Trunks a Specialty 



Telephone 204 Jefferson St. 

THE CITY LIVERY 

John W. Miley, Proprietor 

Stylish Driving Horses a Specialty 
Up-to-Date Rigs 



LEXINGTON 



E. A. MOORE, Pkesident 

DANIEL WELSH, V.-Pres. 

Wm. M. McELWP;E, Cashikr 
R. C. WALKER, AssT. Cash. 



ORGANIZED APRIL I, I9O4 



The Peoples National Bank 

Capital Stock, $50,000 



We solicit business 

from the Cadets of 

the Institute 



LEXINGTON 









CHARLES H. HULBURD 
WILLIAM S. WARREN 
REUBEN G. CHANDLER 
OSCAR T, HULBURD 
CHARLES JAY NORTHUP 






New York Stock Exchance 
Chicayo Stock Exchange 
Chicago Board of Trade 
Minneapolis Board of Trade 
St. Louis Merchants Exchance 
New York Produce Exchange 



Hulburd, Warren & Chandler 

Stocli Broilers and 
Commission Merchants 



TELEPHONES 



202 LA SALLE STREET 
CHICAGO 



IS the Barber Shop where 
Cadets find everything 
just right. Pohteness, Effi- 
cient workmanship, and 
elaborate fixtures combine 
to make the Model Barber 
Shop the favorite of all 
who have and appreciate 
the be^. :: :: :: :: :: :: 

H. A. WILLIAMS 

Main Street, Lexington, Virginia 
Next door to Bank of Rockbridge 



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V. M. I. Cadets 

Can get * 

Cards, Programs, Circulars, f 
Letter Heads and j; 

Envelopes % 

r 

Printed satisfactorily at *J- 

I 
The County News | 

Job Office I 

Opposite Presbyterian Lecture l^oom X 

Lexington, Virginia X 



4- 






l/'Crp TM C'XCp WITH THE MARCH OF PROGRESS 



by purchasing the "20lh Century Bulter Product" 




DOES NOT 

GET 

RANCID 



SAVE 50% 

ON YOUR 

BUTTER 

BILLS 



Made under both Government and State inspedlion. 

"Uhe CAPITAL CITY DAIRY CO., Columbus, Ohio 



Herbert Mi ley 

HIGH -CLASS 
STATIONERY 



First National Bank Building 
FIRST FLOOR 



SAMPLE ROOM FOR TRAVELLING MEN 
BUS TO AND FROM STATION 



^ 



The Lexington | 



S. H. BROCKENBROUGH 

SPECIAL FACILITIES 
TO CADETS AND 
THEIR PARENTS 

Rates: $2.00 and $2.50 per day 
MAIN STREET, LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



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The attention of Cadets, Ex-Cadets, and others seeking Life 
Insurance is respectfully called to the claims of the 

national Cifc Tnsurance €o. 

of Ucrmont 

Commenced business in 1S50 A strong, progressive conservation Company. 

Satisfied Policy-holders. Get acquainted with its history and 

you will buy your Insurance in THE NATIONAL 



Write to Us for Information 



Fked Pleasakts, General Agent 
Richmond, Virginia 



Sajiuel B. Walker, .Jr., District Agent 
I-.exington, Virginia 



Vhe 

¥ 

Next Door to Postoffice 

I T. J. JACKSON & SON 

PROPRIETORS 



Stop Chewing and Call 
Phone 45 

R. S. BRUCE 

Meat 
Market 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



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,^^^.««^ 



A. H. F ETTl N G 

TEMPORARY LOCATION 213 NORTH LIBERTY STREET, BALTIMORE, MD. 



# 



MANUFACTURER 

GREEK LETTER 
FRATERNITY 
JEWELRY 



^ 



Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member through the 
Secretary of his chapter. Special Designs and Estimates furnished 
on Class Pins, Rings, Medals, for Athletic Meets, etc. :: :: :: :: ;: 



We Have Them! 



'TEAMS that you would be 
proud of. All ihe style that 
you can stand. All the safety 
that you want. Speedy, well- 
matched teams, that you would 
not be ashamed of if you had 
some other fellow's sweetheart 
with you and were to meet him. 
Our buggies are not rattle-trap 
kind, but light, strong, new, and 
kept in perfect order. We call 
at residences for trunks, at any 
hour and meet all trains. Hold 
your checks for our prompt de- 
livery of baggage. 



PALACE LIVERY STABLES 

JOHN ]. SHERIDAN, Proprietor 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



Washington and 
Lee University 

Lexington, Virginia 

Letters, Engineering, 
Science, Law 



For catalogue and further information 
address President George H. Denny, 
Lexington, Virginia. £ £ £ £ Jc £ 



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No. 3221 



THE 



State National Bank 



OF FORT WORTH. TEXAS 



CAPITAL, $200,000 

SURPLUS EARNED, $350,000 



Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent in Burglar- Fire-Proof Vault 



Officers and Directors 



T. A. McDowell 
Milton Eppstein 
James Harrison 
Ed. H Lysaght 
Guinn Williams 

M. Sansom 
W. B. Ward, Jr. 

J. I. Burgess 
1. H. (Buck) Smitl 
A. J. MuQuatters 



W. C. STUART 

UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS 
STATIONERY, SPORTING 
GOODS, and everythiiig per- 
taining to our business :: :: :: 

FRATERNITY PAPER, POST 
CARDS AND FANCY BOOKS 



OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 



Ridabock & Company 

110-112 Fourth Ave., New York 

MANUFACTURERS 

COLLEGE, U. S. ARMY 

AND NATIONAL 

GUARD 

UNIFORMS & \ 
EQUIPMENTS 



AUTHORIZED OUTFITTERS /or Ihe 
VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE 









f. %. I^oimg 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

Corner Washington and Jefferson Streets 
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA 

HAVE A NICE LINE OF SAMPLES TO SELECT FROM 



. W. HANCOCK, Pres. 

. A. HANCOCK. Vice- 

, N. HANCOCK, Sec'y 

and Consulting Engii 



C. W. Hancock & Sons 

General Contractors 



Offices; 
LYNCHBURG, VA. 
AND ROANOKE, VA. 



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A.*******.%****%****%*%*%*t,^. 



W. H.Urquhart Spencer L. Carter 

President Vice-President 

J. C. Carroll 

Sec'y and Treas. 

Works: Seawall, Md. 

Offices: Natl. Marine Bank Building 
Baltimore, Md. 

Rasin Monumental Company 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

■^YITH our large steel mill buildings 
and our strictly modern Sulphuric 
Acid chambers, we find that we can 
out-distance the old methods of manu- 
facturing and handling fertilizers 
Owning our own equipment, such as 
locomotive, tug-boat, lighters, etc., en- 
ables us to give prompt dispatch to all 
of our orders . Correspondence solicited. 

Rasin Monumental Company 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



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Lyons Tailoring Company 

Lexington, Virginia 

ColUgf ulatlnra 



We can fit you in Dress as well as in 
Business Suits 



Main and Nelson Streets 



^ 


[lveI 


[ Summer 
Cavalry 
1 School 


^ ^Bni 




What could be finer 


f I 




for a A MI man's 
summer lea\e than 
a course in horse- 
manship' For eight 


JL^Mn^mm 


tg-y^',^ jfi^ 


weeks duriug July 
and August he may 


*■"" '" \, 


* 


add the training of 


the cavalryman to his raili 
the same tune he will ha 
ami delightful outing on 
even form ol athletic 
an,r attractive j^ 
social diver- .^^K 


tarv education and at 

\e a most interesting 

a beautiful lake with 

and aquatic sports 


sions. Last 
year's V. M. I. 

took this course, 
and was much 
pleased with it. 
Catalogue will 
be sent on re- 




^ 


quest. Address, 




I^^^EJ^B ^ 


THE 




T^ jdFM ^ 


COHHANDANT. 




Pirtf^^^^Q 


CULVER SUMMER 




PPlByyL«MBijBHH 


CAVALRY SCHOOL 
Culver, Indiana 




^■^^^^' 



Nnrmal i^rtynnl 



Twenty-sixth session begins Sep- 
tember 8th. For catalogue and 
information concerning 
State Scholarships 
write to 



J. L. JARMAN. President 

Farmville, Va. 






I L. G. Jahnke & Company 

X Main Street, Lexington, Virginia 




Watchmakers. Jewelers 
AND Opticians 

WatrlirH, Stamnnbs, 3rujplrg 
(dut-OJlaBa, SiilwFruiarp.gillurr- 
platpJi Warp, ©ptiral (^aabs :: 



Special Attention Given to Repairing Fine Watches 

Spe<5lacles and Eye Glasses Accurately Fitted to the Eyes 

Headquarters for College and Fraternity Jewelry 



A. D. Sessions & Co. 



Fresh Fish 
Soft Crabs 
N Terrapins 

? Office and Warehouse: 28 Market Place 

i 
t 

i Wholesale Fish Market, Stall M 

I BALTIMORE, MD. 



T. HERBERT SHRIVER, Presideol 
B. F. SHRIVER, Vice-Presidenl 
WILLIAM SHRIVER, Sec. 4 Treas. 

B. F. SHRIVER CO. 

ProJucers and Packers of 

A No. I, NeAarine, Blue Ridge, 

Frank & Herbert Brands, 

Corn, Peas, String 

Beans, Lima 

Beans 

and Succotash 



FAnORlES LOCATED AT ^ 

WESTMINSTER, MD. UNION MILLS. MD. t 

NEW WINDSOR, MD. LITTLESTOWN, PA. f 

I 

t 



Offices : WeslminsUr, Md. 



t 




THE BLACKSTONE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



Has since 1894 given "Thorough instruction under positively Christian 
influences at the least possible cost." 

RESULT : Iti is to-day, with its faculty of 32, its boarding patron- 
age of 300, and its plant worth $140,000, 

The Leading Training School for Girls in Virginia 

$150 pays all charges for the year, including table board, room, lights, 
steam heat, laundry, medical attention, physical culture, and tuition in 
all subjects except music and elocution. Early application should be 
made for catalogue and application blanks to 

JAMES CANNON, Jr., M. A., Principal, Blackstone, Va. 



A 



^ 



TEXAS Friend of the "BOMB," 
appreciating its objedt and efficiency, is 
pleased to extend congratulations 
and encourage its staff. We refer to 
N. E. Grammer of Fort Worth, Texas. 



N. E. Grammer, Druggist 

100 and 200 Main Street Fort Worth, Texas 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 



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MILEY & SON 

Olarbon ^t«l»to 




J®®©©®®eX3©©©®©®6X3 



Lexington, Va. 



i 



Irwin & Company 

Main Street, Opposite Presbyterian Church 



For ^Decorating Your l^ooms : Rugs, 
Druggets, Curtains, Sofa Pillows, 
Table Covers, etc. 

For Jldornmg the Outer ^an : Col- 
lars, Cuffs, Handkerchiefs, Suspend- 
ers, Socks, Ties, etc. 

For T^efreshing the Inner ^an: 
Everything good to eat. 



5..J-J-5..J-5~>^-J~I-i~5-J~>.>.J»t_I.^yx-^•^•H"^♦^•^•^•^♦•^•^•^^^- 



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W. M. KRAMER 
artistic Becorator 




Lexington, Virginia 



All the latest and most 
■^ unique st^)les of deco- 
rating for Fancy 'Dress 
^alls, etc Vhe ^all 
Rooms of the "Oirgima 
Military Institute and 
Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity show his artistic 
ability, yln ample stock 
of decorations always on 
hand. Cut flowers at all 
times. Quick toork- 'Per- 
fe£i satisfa&ion. Give 
him a trial. £ £ £ £ 



The Maryland Agricultural College 



Seven courses of instruction : 

Agricultural 

Horticultural 

Military- Training 

Engineering — 

Mechanical 

Civil 

Electrical 

Scientific 

Chemical 

For particulars address 

R. W. SYLVESTER 

President 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 




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Southern Express Company 

=: Money Orders ^ = 



T4HIS COMPANY sells money orders at all its offices, payable at all 
the express offices in the country, and in Havana, Cuba. Rates on 
gSgS j these money orders are as low as the lowest They can be obtained 
s=S_!l in the most convenient manner, and if lost will be refunded. No 
application is required. Affords the most convenient way of remit 
ting money to cadets, or for incidental expenses. Operating on 30,000 miles 
of first-class routes in the States of Alabama, Arkansas, District of Columbia, 
Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missis- 
sippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia 
and West Virginia, and to Havana, Cuba. 



Southern Express Company 



R. J. F. ROEHM 


SCO. 


Fraternity 


Spm^brs 


•1- 


2 1 Grand River Ave., Ea^ 


DETROIT, MICH. 



PINEHURST, N. C. 

'Ube Famous Winter Resort 

Four Hotels 

and Fifty Cottages and 

Apartments 



No Consumptives Allowed 



PINEHURST GENERAL OFFICE 

Pinehurst, North Carolina 



:]^,.M•,5-H~K^^*^•^•^^♦^♦^•^^'•♦^•^♦•^•K'~^•^•^-^•^-^^'•^^^•^•^•^•^-^^^^ 



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The Shop of Quality 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

HATS and SHOES 



I 

I OUR LINES are ESPECIALLY SUITED 

I TO THE WANTS OF V. M. I. MEN 

X 



GRAHAM & CAMPBELL | 

4 Main Street LEXINGTON, VA. | 



i. 



-| 



% 



t 



CHARLES PRACHT & CO. | 
I — Manufa(5luring Confediioners- 

Wholesale Dealers in Foreign Fruits 

Nuts, Confed:ioners' and 

Bakers' Supplies 

Etc. 



X 406-408 We^ Franklin Street DAT ""rTN/FODCr *' 



X P.O. Box 797 Ur^Lj 1 llVlVv'lVl-, .|. 



' B.H.Gorrell 
Bruggtst 






^ Prescriptions Carefully 
Compounded at All Hours 
by Registered Pharmacists 

TELEPHONE 41 



17 W. Nelson St. Lexington, Va. 



SELECT STOCK OF 



DRUGS. MEDICINES. | 

CHEMICALS, ETC. J 

STATIONERY, i 

PENS, INKS. I 

FANCY GOODS | 

FINE SODA WATER 
COCA-COLA 



H. L DENOON, Pres. W. L. WALTERS, V.-Pres. and Cashier S. E. WALTERS, Asst. Cashier t 

i 



Commonwealth Bank 

1 2 North Ninth St., RICHMOND, VA. 

Capital, $200,000 



SAFE AND SOLID 



4 



YJ INTEREST on Savings Accounts .(. 



j. DIFilSOTrOFSS : J- 

i J. F. Walsh, P. C. Christian, H. L. Denoon, Geo. C. Walters, W. L. X 

Y Wade, Chas. B. Cooke, Hugh Denoon, Isaac B. T 

•}• Davenport, W. L. Walters. <• 



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Graham's Shoe Store : 

r SHOES, HATS AND r) 
•^SPORTING GOODS •>• 



WE FIT HEADS AND FEET 



Main Street ^ Lexington, Virginia 

OPPOSITE LEXINGTON HOTEL •_>-'/«. i^ j (^ 



Y. M. I. SUTLER'S store: 

H. KRAUSE, FisoPKiETOR 



Nothing but high-class goods in stock, al- 
ways fresh. Candies, Canned Goods, Cakes 
and Pies of all varieties. 




SPECIALS— Hot Sausage and Hambergers 
Ice Cream 



IN SEASON 



New V. M. I Postals and Pictures always in stock. For the 
accommodation of Cadets, wf, sell stamps and have a special 
delivery of mail to the Postoffice twice a day, excepting Sunday, 
immediately after Guard Mounting and Tattoo. Courteous 
and quick service.